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Sources and causes of construction waste 

Sources and causes of construction waste 

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Material wastage has been recognized as a common cause of construction waste generation. Ineffective planning and control of materials on sites could lead to poor performance and undesirable project outcomes. In response to the Construction Industry Development Board's (CIDB) effort in developing the Standard Code of Practice for Construction Solid...

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Context 1
... waste can occur at any stage of construction not only because of construction activities but also due to external factors such as theft and vandalism (Bossink and Brouwers, 1996). Hence, the aforementioned sources of waste were combined in this study and categorized as shown in Table 2, which was then adopted for the purpose of conducting the survey in this study. ...

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