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Some of the largest transnational Muslim NGOs and their country of origin 

Some of the largest transnational Muslim NGOs and their country of origin 

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Transnational Muslim NGOs are important actors in the field of development and humanitarian aid. Through micro-sociological case studies, this article provides new empirical insights on the organizational identity of some of these NGOs. Using the post 9.11. aid field as a window through which to explore transnational Muslim NGOs, the article analyz...

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... recent years have seen the emergence of a number of Turkish NGOs. See Table 1 for an overview of some of the largest Muslim NGOs, their budgets and their country of origin. 18 Muslim NGOs in the Post 9.11. ...

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... For additional details, seeMansour and Ezzat 2009: pp.119-122. 5 For more information about the difficulties facing state-affiliated FBOs, seeSvoboda et al. 2015; similar case could be noticed in Human Rights Commission, seePetersen 2012Petersen -2013 For more details about the differences among various FBOs, see Clarke and Ware 2015: p.40.Khafagy Journal of International Humanitarian Action (2020) 5:13 ...
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