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Socio-demographic characteristics of the surveyed pet owner population

Socio-demographic characteristics of the surveyed pet owner population

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Background: Over recent years, pet owners have started to demonstrate increased sensitivity toward their companion animals, which includes an increase in the attention paid towards their nutrition, seen as a way of safeguarding their pets' welfare. The aim of this study was to identify how pet food quality traits are perceived as being the most im...

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... socio-demographic characteristics of the surveyed pet owners are reported in Table 1. Sixty-one point 8 % were women. ...

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... Nowadays, pet food buyers have access to numerous sources of information about their pet's nutrition. Information can be obtained from veterinarians, the Internet, animal trainers, pet store employees, pet nutrition books, pet company websites, or other owners of pets, even if this information does not always come from reliable sources (Vinassa et al., 2020). Another survey conducted on a sample of 93% women out of a total of 2181 respondents concluded that the most used source of information on choosing pet food is veterinarians (40%), followed by the Internet (24%). ...
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... Nowadays, pet food buyers have access to numerous sources of information about their pet's nutrition. Information can be obtained from veterinarians, the Internet, animal trainers, pet store employees, pet nutrition books, pet company websites, or other owners of pets, even if this information does not always come from reliable sources (Vinassa et al., 2020). Another survey conducted on a sample of 93% women out of a total of 2181 respondents concluded that the most used source of information on choosing pet food is veterinarians (40%), followed by the Internet (24%). ...
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... In this context, to attract consumers, marketing professionals are more and more interested in the owners' perception [3]. Some marketing ploys may bias the owner's perception of the nutritional quality of the chosen diet: a recent study about the Italian pet food buyers, reported that the presence of "natural" ingredients was considered as an important indicator of pet food quality from pet owners point of view [21]. On the other hand, there is an increasing interest of owners about nutrition trends like "grain free", "homemade", "raw food" or "vegetarian" diets for dogs. ...
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... Different pet owners, however, consider different types of pet food, with varying product attributes to fulfil the nutritional requirements of their pet [16,17]. The most important product attributes appear to be price, perceived ingredient safety, and perceived quality and nutritional value [17][18][19][20][21]. ...
... Further evidence stems from veterinarian research. Veterinarian studies have found that pet owners actively seek specific product attributes when purchasing pet food and consider their vet and the Internet as essential information sources when it comes to pet food purchases [19,41]. These findings have been confirmed by Park and Um (2021) and Kwak and Cha (2021) in their research on pet food purchases and consumer behaviour in times of COVID-19 [25,42]. ...
... Similarly, several other studies found that knowledge about pet food and pet food attributes among pet owners is varied [53]. While some owners have good knowledge, others need to improve their feeding and food storage practices and educate themselves on the health, safety, and nutrition of certain pet food types and their attributes [19,54,55]. ...
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... More recent studies show that pet ownership and preferences for pet supplies and services including food are rather a matter of experience, attitudes and lifestyle [17,18,21]. Studies dedicated to pet food quality, pet food industries and pet food preservation and storage show that women are more likely to decide which pet food to buy [48][49][50]. Pets are present in 85% of all US households and ownership occurs throughout all social classes, across all ages, levels of income and education [1,17,21]. ...
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