Figure - uploaded by Magnus Wennerhag
Content may be subject to copyright.
Socio-demographic characteristics of climate protesters (percent and total numbers).

Socio-demographic characteristics of climate protesters (percent and total numbers).

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Present debates suppose a close linkage between economic, social, and environmental sustainability and suggest that individual wellbeing and living standards need to be understood as directly linked to environmental concerns. Because social movements are often seen as an avant-garde in pushing for change, this article analyzes climate protesters’ s...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... was especially the case when it came to gender. While much previous research has shown equal numbers of women and men participating in demonstrations (e.g., [25,[41][42]), women were overrepresented in the Global Climate Strikes with around 63% of the total participants (see Table 2). In terms of age, almost half of the respondents were younger than 35 years old. ...
Context 2
... was especially the case when it came to gender. While much previous research has shown equal numbers of women and men participating in demonstrations (e.g., [25,[41][42]), women were overrepresented in the Global Climate Strikes with around 63% of the total participants (see Table 2). In terms of age, almost half of the respondents were younger than 35 years old. ...
Context 3
... was especially the case when it came to gender. While much previous research has shown equal numbers of women and men participating in demonstrations (e.g., [25,41,42]), women were overrepresented in the Global Climate Strikes with around 63% of the total participants (see Table 2). In terms of age, almost half of the respondents were younger than 35 years old. ...

Citations

... (Piispa and Kiilakoski, 2021) and Terren and Soler-i-Marti (2021) found that young people view climate change as an issue of justice. Additionally, young people are linking climate change to capitalism (Holmberg and Alvinius, 2020;Pickard et al., 2020) and are willing to put the needs of the environment above those of the economy (Emilsson et al., 2020). ...
Article
Full-text available
The year 2018 was a watershed year for young people's climate activism. In this review article, we explore the methodological trends and key themes across contemporary academic literature on young people's climate activism. In the academic literature, following an initial wave of survey-based research of young people and textual analysis of secondary data like media reportage, the field is experiencing a second wave of qualitative research and a resurgence of emphasis on youth voice in research. Accordingly, we identify the strengths of the existing literature in its exploration of key themes including the composition, practices and outcomes of young people's climate activism, and the ways young people understand and act on climate change. We identify several gaps in the literature that arise from a disproportionate focus on research topics, and especially a disproportionate focus on activism in the global North and in wealthy and White communities, a focus on mass mobilizations, and an intensive interest in the individual activist Greta Thunberg. Our analysis leads to recommendations for future research based on three conceptual challenges. We argue that future research must respond to these challenges: first, the limited and constraining social constructions of “youth” as a category; second, the practical challenges of working with young people, not least in relationships of consent; and third, the need to respond to adultism in research practices and to develop youth-centered approaches to the activism of young people. This review article intends to contribute to a step change in theory and methods for the study of young people's climate activism.
... Following previous research on political attitudes among protesters and in the climate movement more specifically (e.g. Emilsson et al. 2020;Wahlström et al. 2013;Wahlström et al. 2019), the analyses control for basic personal characteristics including age, gender, education and left-right placement. Age is particularly important considering the youthfulness of FFF and was accordingly recoded to distinguish those below the age of 20 from those above. ...
Article
Full-text available
Climate adaptation is seen by many as increasingly important and as deeply political, leading some to argue for its democratization. Social movements could play an important role in this. Meanwhile, we have recently witnessed a major swell in climate activism, as well as a growing realization among climate activists that it may be too late to prevent major climate disruptions. Yet to what extent this may lead to a focus on adaptation in the climate movement remains understudied. To address this gap in the literature, the current paper draws on survey data from 2,344 participants in Fridays For Future climate demonstrations in September 2019 in 13 cities in Europe, Australia and the USA. The analyses show that while one-half of the respondents still attributes greater weight to mitigation, the other half attributes equal weight to adaptation and mitigation, indicating a greater emphasis on adaptation than previously assumed. It is found that those supporting (equal focus on) adaptation experience less hope about the effectiveness of climate policies, and portray a reluctance to support far-reaching climate action. The latter indicates that support for adaptation in the climate movement is associated with conservative attitudes, indicating constraints for the emergence of a climate movement for transformational adaptation.
... On the other hand, there is also evidence for a negative relationship between age and the willingness to contribute to environmental protection efforts (Carlsson & Johansson-Stenman, 2000) and, empirically, individuals who demonstrate for climate protection tend to be younger. For instance, in a Swedish sample of climate change protesters, 48.5% of participants were below the age of 35, while only 16.1% were above the age of 65 (Emilsson et al., 2020). Again, it is possible that some of the discrepancies in the literature are attributable to cheap talk effects. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
The negative impact of climate change on mental health has gained increased attention in recent years, with studies documenting elevated rates of mental disorders in areas affected by natural disasters. At the same time, anxiety or distress over climate change have been described as natural responses to an existential threat that is not per se pathological. Climate change distress (CCD) may even be a motivating force for pro-environmental behavior (PEB) and ultimately help mitigate the effects of climate change. In the present study, we tested a number or pre-registered hypotheses (https://osf.io/jqb58) on the association between CCD and PEB in an online sample of 550 German-speaking participants. We assessed PEB at a behavioral level using a modified work-for-environmental-protection-task and a modified dictator game, and measured CCD and climate change-associated impairment (CCI) via self-report. Additionally, we investigated participant age and gender as moderators of the CCD-PEB association (data and code available at https://osf.io/eprdw/). In a series of regression analyses, we observed that CCD was linearly associated with a higher level of PEB in both paradigms, such that individuals who were more distressed were more likely to complete a working memory task to generate donations or sacrifice their own payoff in the dictator game to donate to environmental protection organizations. As predicted, younger individuals and women (vs. men) experienced higher levels of both CCD and CCI. Contrary to hypotheses, age and gender did not moderate the CCD-PEB association. We discuss the high prevalence of CCD in the sample and lay out directions for future work to assess avenues for increasing PEB whilst protecting climate-related mental health.
... Furthermore, not all actors believed utilising marginal land is needed and even challenged the very concept of marginality.Rather it can be argued that suggesting marginal lands as a solution is presents a dominant set of frames with marginalised counter-framings. This could be due to the diversity of actors and stakeholders that utilise these frames and the ideological differences between them (Emilsson et al., 2020). For example, the Rural Development frame was utilised by farmer's groups while the Land Rights frame was utilised by NGOs in the area of international development. ...
Article
Full-text available
Appropriating marginal land is seen as a way to overcome a wide range of land-use challenges such as food-feed-fuel competition, avoiding land abandonment, and preserving nature. As a result, there is growing interest in policy and academic communities to identify, define and measure the potential of marginal land to overcome these challenges. However, multiple definitions of marginal land exist due to the various ways of framing the problems and the solutions marginal land can address. This leads to a number of competing claims on and diverging debates about marginal land. To explore the competing claims on marginal land in these frames, we performed a framing analysis of EU policy debates about marginal land. Through this analysis, we find that different actors have conflicting ways of framing what problems marginal land can address and what courses of action to take. These frames do not overcome but form part of contested land-use debates already present in Europe. Exact definitions or estimations of marginal land are unlikely to overcome land-use debates because land-use decisions are subject to the same competing claims and hence normative decisions as land-use decisions around productive land. These marginal land frames reflect a vision for how land should be used; for food, feed, fuel or nature. We argue that exact estimations of marginal land are unlikely to fix controversies on land-use due to the inherent ambiguity of marginal land. Instead, we believe that deliberative science-policy relationships are needed.
... The current study advances the literature on collective action and protest participation in several ways. First, it provides some of the first empirical evidence on the motives for participation in the Fridays for Future strikes, one of the largest environmental social movements to date (for other studies on the climate strikes see: [16][17][18][19][20]. Second, it adds to the current literature on climate protest participation due to its novel approach of investigating the drivers of both participation and non-participation. ...
... On the one hand, an emotionfocused type of coping is based on the regulation of these emotions [31], with more concerned individuals being more likely to take action to reduce the negative consequences they fear [30]. On the other hand, collective efficacy beliefs represent a problem-focused coping strategy, whereby individuals engage in collective action when they perceive the group to be able to solve a collective action problem (19). Based on the literature, participation in the Fridays for Future strikes will likely be determined by climate change worry and perceived collective efficacy. ...
Article
Full-text available
The Fridays for Future strikes involve students striking for increased action on climate change, and this movement has spread to 185 countries and received widespread media attention. This exploratory study investigates motives for participating or not in the climate strikes and future participation among students in Switzerland. In a sample of N = 638 university students, we found that trust in climate scientists, low trust in governments, response efficacy, protest enjoyment and the perceived success of the strikes predicted participation. Contrary to statements in the public media but consistent with the literature, students who participated in the climate strikes reported consuming less meat, flying less and taking more steps to compensate the CO 2 emissions from flights compared to students who did not participate. We discuss how the insights from this study help reveal the determinants of youth collective action on climate change.
... Transnational environmental advocacy efforts must also cope with differences and disparities across social groups and among the many actors that engage in contention within this issue area (23). Their ability to cope with this broad range of differences can impact their ability to achieve cooperation and political influence (24,25). Indigenous Peoples involved in transnational climate justice activism are engaged in a constant struggle to balance the tactical aspiration of portraying Indigenous Peoples as a unified bloc (13**) allthewhile working to cope with the differences that mark the diversity of perspectives and identities that mobilize under the collective identities of Indigenous Peoples. ...
Article
Full-text available
To what extent do Indigenous Peoples exert influence over global climate decision-making processes? Recent studies observe the increased presence and influence of Indigenous Peoples over climate negotiations while also recognizing the limits of their political influence. For instance, Indigenous Peoples successfully advocated state parties to include language in the Paris Agreement of the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that recognized their role in designing, adopting, and implementing climate change policies. Yet, activists continue to push for broader participation of Indigenous Peoples in United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change conferences. This article reviews the state of knowledge on the political impact of Indigenous Peoples in spaces of global climate governance and the mechanisms by which Indigenous Peoples exert political influence. This review identifies three prominent debates on the question of the influence of Indigenous Peoples in global climate governance: (1) What constitutes Indigenous Peoples political influence over global climate governance, (2) the extent to which Indigenous Peoples exert it, and (3) whether the political influence of Indigenous Peoples over global climate governance is enough to stop climate regimes from harming them.
Article
Bu makalede küresel iklim hareketinin öyküsü, başlangıcından günümüze kadar dört dönem çerçevesinde ele alınmış, hareketin mevcut durumu ve geleceği son dönemde öne çıkmış yeni aktörlere odaklanılarak incelenmiştir. Greta Thunberg öncülüğündeki gençlik aktivizmi, Yokoluş İsyanı ve Gündoğumu Hareketi bu yeni aktörlere örnek olarak seçilmiştir. Makalede, bu yeni aktörlerin katılımı sayesinde hareketin başarı şansını eskiye göre anlamlı biçimde arttırıp artırmadığı sorusuna yanıt aranmıştır. Yeni aktörlerin harekete olumlu katkıları reddedilemez, ancak bu aktörler, hareketin önemli bir değişim gerçekleştirmek konusunda eskiden beri sahip olduğu zorlukların üstesinden gelmek için bir paradigma değişikliği yaratmadıkları gibi bazı görüşlerin aksine bu yeni dalga 1960'ların veya 70'lerin büyük toplumsal hareketleriyle kıyaslanabilecek yaygın bir toplumsal seferberlik yaratma potansiyeline de sahip değildir. İklim hareketi yeni aktörlerle kayda değer bir ivme yakalamış olsa da eskiden olduğu gibi bugün de taleplerinin karşılanması noktasında halen başarıya yakın değildir. Öte yandan hareketin başarısı, yalnızca aktörlerin sayısı veya politika üzerindeki etkileri değil, yarattıkları rezonans açısından da değerlendirilebilir. İklim hareketinin yeni dalgası başlangıçta bu şekilde güçlü bir kamusal yankı uyandırmışsa da artık limitlerine ulaşmış, pandeminin etkileri, yinelenen dahili sorunlar ile birleşerek bu dalganın seferber edici kapasitesinin tükenmeye başlamasına neden olmuştur. Hareketin toplumsal tabanını genişletmek için ikna etmenin rasyonel (ve duygusal) temeli olarak iklim bilimine olan münhasır güvenini yeniden değerlendirmesi, anlatılarını potansiyel katılımcıların sosyal ve ekonomik gerçeklerine doğru genişletmesi gerekmektedir.
Article
This article lays out an agenda for researching the social policy challenges facing the EU under the combined impact of a triple transition: green, digital and demographic. It takes as its starting point the double bind confronting the welfare state, pressured by increasing costs and serious socio-ecological concerns on the one hand, and the need, more daunting than ever, for protection against a vast array of imminent socio-economic, demographic and environmental risks, on the other. Against this background, it explores the complex web of synergies and trade-offs between the three transitions, examines the disjointed manner in which EU social policy has so far developed, and demonstrates the controversial stance of the EU’s overarching strategic framework – the European Green Deal – on the issue of a socially just transition. It also maps key research foci and gaps deserving further study, including the role of key players in the transition.
Article
This article describes activities and strategies hybrid businesses use to enhance environmental wellbeing, including a mix of modelling, education, stewardship, collaboration and nature connection. It is based on a multi-case study focusing on three hybrid businesses. Observation indicated there were benefits for both the natural environment and to people involved with the organisations, suggesting caring for the environment and for people can occur concurrently. Activities described could be adopted by social workers interested in increasing environmental wellbeing and justice, including a focus on the environment in social work and promoting the implementation of an alternative social-economic world system.
Article
Full-text available
Drawing from interviews with 31 young leading climate activists from 23 countries across the world this article aims to capture the contribution of the recent youth climate movement to communicating climate science and politics. We show that from the point of view of the youth activists, the movement powerfully connects personal and local experiences and emotions with climate science. This has enabled the activists to construct an authentic, generational and temporal identity that has helped them to carve out an autonomous position and voice with considerable moral authority among existing climate policy actors. Claiming to represent the future generation, we conclude that activists have offered an important added value to climate science as new ambassadors for scientific consensus and climate mitigation. The youth movement and the added value it brings communicating climate science is an example of the dynamics of the formation of “relational publics” and emphasizes the need to understand better the networked communication landscape where climate politics is debated.