Table 1 - uploaded by Marzieh Nojomi
Content may be subject to copyright.
Sleep/awake habits characteristics of subjects (n=400) 

Sleep/awake habits characteristics of subjects (n=400) 

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Sleep disturbances is a distressing and disabling condition that affects many people, and can affect on quality of work and education of medical students and residents. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders in medical students and residents. A representative sample of medical students and residents of Iran U...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... sleep/wake characteristics are shown in Table 1. The majority of participants usually went to bed between 22:00 and 24:00 o'clock (particularly among pre-internship group, P=0.01); most of them got up at or before 7:00 o'clock in the morning (specially, among residents, P=0.02). ...

Citations

... In consistence with number of former studies that found advanced years of training a risk factor for subjective sleep disturbance and sleep dissatisfaction [19,37] or related to decline of total sleep quality [20,38], our results revealed significant positive correlation between duration of residency and sleep latency (r = 0.185, p = 0.024*) that denotes decline in sleep amount and poor sleep efficiency and quality with advance of years of residency. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Sleep disturbances among medical staff are common serious entities with devastating consequences. Numerous studies have analyzed the effects of residency on the quality of sleep of the medical trainees in various specialties, but only few studies were conducted in Egypt. Results One hundred fifty medical residents from various medical and surgical specialties who work in the hospitals of Ain Shams University, Egypt, agreed to participate in our study. Sociodemographic and work-related data were collected by a semi-structured sheet. Sleep quality was assessed by self-administered questionnaire—Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). According to the PSQI, 96.7% of the residents had poor sleep quality with mean PSQI score of 10.4 ± 2.5. No statistically significant difference was detected among the different specialties. Poorer sleep quality was more frequent among senior residents who spent longer duration in residency. The number of hours of sleep before residency and the number of days off during residency were the main predictors of total PSQI score and determinants of sleep quality Conclusions Poor sleep quality is highly prevalent among medical residents and is associated with work-related factors. It is necessary to consider residents’ sleep estate and conduct more analyses to diagnose, treat, and improve their sleep quality.
... Numerous studies have found a high rate of sleep disturbance among medical and university residents, from 1.5% to 40%, assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). 17,18 Long duration and intensity of studies, emotionally challenging work and overnight on-call duties with long working hours have been identified as causative factors for sleep deprivation. 5,6,19,20 For this survey, the LSEQ was chosen instead of the PSQI. ...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The stress level of participants in high-fidelity simulation stems from various factors but may result in anticipatory anxiety causing sleep disturbances during the night prior to simulation. The objective of this survey was to determine the change in sleep quality of residents during the night prior to the simulation. Methods: The survey was proposed for 1 year to all residents at the beginning of the simulation, in 10 simulation centres. The questionnaire combined demographics and the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire using visual analogue scales divided into 4 sleep qualitative domains. The primary outcome was the prevalence of sleep disturbance (>10 mm on 1 domain). Secondary outcomes were the prevalence of severe sleep disturbance (>25 mm), as well as qualitatively and quantitatively reported explanatory sleep parameters. Results: Among respondents, 66% [95% CI: 63 to 69] of residents had more than 10 mm and 27% [95% CI: 24 to 30] had more than 25 mm of sleep disturbance. Residents with a sleep disturbance of more than 10 mm had fewer hours of sleep (6.4 [standard deviation=1.8] vs 7.3 [standard deviation=1.3], difference: -0.9 [95% CI: -1.1 to -0.7]; P < .0001), with a higher number of night-time awakenings (1.3 [standard deviation=1.5] vs 0.7 [standard deviation=0.9], difference: 0.6 [95% CI: 0.4 to 0.8]; P < .0001). Conclusion: Among residents participating in the simulation, a high prevalence of change in sleep quality during the night before the simulation was noted. Strategies to help residents achieve better sleep prior to simulation should be explored.
... Sleep quality is a measurement that is related to sleep hygiene and poor sleep quality has been understood to have serious health consequences [19]. Further, studies have documented poor sleep quality among university students [20][21][22]. In China, a study also revealed a high prevalence of sleep problems among college students during the COVID-19 epidemic [23]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The outbreak of COVID-19 has seriously threatened the health of people around the world. To prevent the spread of the epidemic, Chinese universities have implemented closed management of campuses. The implementation of restrictive measures has gradually caused changes in the quality of sleep and the psychological state of college students. In addition, college students are faced with the dual pressure of employment and study, and the psychological pressure is huge. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate sleep and depressive symptoms among college students. Methods: Using the method of stratified cluster sampling, 6695 college students were selected from three universities in Jiangxi, Anhui, and Xinjiang provinces from April to May 2022. The Chinese version of the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and the self-rating depression scale (SDS) were used for the survey. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between the PSQI and the SDS. Results: Overall, during the outbreak of COVID-19, 69.0% of males and 73.5% of females had poor sleep quality among Chinese college students and the detection rate of depressive symptoms was 43.6% for males and 47.8% for females, respectively. Taking students with good sleep quality as references, after controlling for covariates, hierarchical logistic regression shows that Chinese college students with poor sleep quality have a higher OR value (OR = 12.0, 95%CI: 10.2~14.1, p < 0.001), especially in males (OR = 43.8, 95%CI:30.2~63.6, p < 0.001). For both males and females, the OR value of college students with the following characteristics was higher: rural college students (males, OR = 50.32, 95%CI: 32.50-77.93; females, OR = 8.03, 95%CI: 6.45-9.99), overweight college students (males, OR = 62.17, 95%CI: 19.47-198.53; females, OR = 16.67, 95%CI: 6.48-42.88), and college students drinking sugar-sweetened beverages (males, OR = 59.00, 95%CI: 36.96-94.18; females, OR = 8.16, 95%CI: 6.63-10.05) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Poor sleep quality is associated with depressive symptoms among Chinese college students, especially college males. Our research suggests that it is necessary to consider the improvement of sleep quality and depressive symptoms among college students during the COVID-19 epidemic.
... They are prone to sleep deprivation and unhealthy sleep pattern. 2 Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in the uses of computers, social media as well as the proliferation of audio and video devices and late-night video-gaming zones among individuals. 3 The rise of digital media has altered the lifestyle of young adults, particularly undergraduates. 4 Because of these cultural shifts, young people' sleeping cycles tend to be irregular, and many of them suffer from sleep deprivation, which may have a detrimental influence on daytime activities, particularly study. ...
... There 68% participants had normal BMI. 3 Another study in Kolkata found that, 70.7% were of normal BMI and BMI was significantly associated with global PSQI score as like this study. 14 A statistically significant association between physical exercise and sleep quality which is similar to a study of Spain. 4 Another study also found an association between consumption of tea and sleep quality like this study. ...
Article
Maintaining a regular sleep pattern helps to preserve the timing of the body's internal clock and can aid in having a healthy lifestyle. Medical students are a general population subgroup that is more vulnerable to poor sleep quality. A online based cross sectional study conducted to find out the sleep pattern of 264 undergraduate medical students during COVID-19 pandemic situation by using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) sacle. Medical students spent up to 9 hours in digital media (mean 5.1±2.7 hours) per day. Maximum students had gone to bed within 10.01pm-12am but woke up later while 40.2% of students had severe sleep latency and 32.3% students missed their breakfast due to sleep. Mean sleep duration at night was 6.5±1.3 hours but 64.4% of them had poor sleep quality. There 18.9% students had very low habitual sleep efficiency, 28.4% took daytime nap ≥60 minutes regularly, 68.9% students faced daytime dysfunction. Statistically significant associations was found between BMI, physical exercise, smoking, tea/coffee consumption, taking drugs for stress/recreation, wake-up time and different sleep related variables like sleep duration, sleep latency, sleep efficiency, sleep quality (p<0.05). These results demonstrate that, insufficient sleep and unsatisfactory sleep-wake pattern have been documented among medical students.
... They are prone to sleep deprivation and unhealthy sleep pattern. 2 Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in the uses of computers, social media as well as the proliferation of audio and video devices and late-night video-gaming zones among individuals. 3 The rise of digital media has altered the lifestyle of young adults, particularly undergraduates. 4 Because of these cultural shifts, young people' sleeping cycles tend to be irregular, and many of them suffer from sleep deprivation, which may have a detrimental influence on daytime activities, particularly study. ...
... There 68% participants had normal BMI. 3 Another study in Kolkata found that, 70.7% were of normal BMI and BMI was significantly associated with global PSQI score as like this study. 14 A statistically significant association between physical exercise and sleep quality which is similar to a study of Spain. 4 Another study also found an association between consumption of tea and sleep quality like this study. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Maintaining a regular sleep pattern helps to preserve the timing of the body's internal clock and can aid in having a healthy lifestyle. Medical students are a general population subgroup that is more vulnerable to poor sleep quality. Method: A online based cross sectional study conducted to find out the sleep pattern of 264 undergraduate medical students during COVID-19 pandemic situation by using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) sacle. Results: Medical students spent up to 9 hours in digital media (mean 5.1±2.7 hours) per day. Maximum students had gone to bed within 10.01pm-12am but woke up later while 40.2% of students had severe sleep latency and 32.3% students missed their breakfast due to sleep. Mean sleep duration at night was 6.5±1.3 hours but 64.4% of them had poor sleep quality. There 18.9% students had very low habitual sleep efficiency, 28.4% took daytime nap ≥60 minutes regularly, 68.9% students faced daytime dysfunction. Statistically significant associations was found between BMI, physical exercise, smoking, tea/coffee consumption, taking drugs for stress/recreation, wake-up time and different sleep related variables like sleep duration, sleep latency, sleep efficiency, sleep quality (p < 0.05). Conclusion: These results demonstrate that, insufficient sleep and unsatisfactory sleep-wake pattern have been documented among medical students.
... In the study by Sajadi et al., only 13.1% of students claimed that they had not experienced fatigue, whereas the other respondents suffered from moderate and strong fatigue [88]. Research conducted by Nojomi et al. [89], Lowry et al. [90], Amaducci et al. [35] and Lai et al. [91] showed that over half of the students experienced moderate to severe fatigue, which is consistent with the findings of the above study [89]. A study conducted by Eslami [92] showed that half of the students had experienced fatigue. ...
... In the study by Sajadi et al., only 13.1% of students claimed that they had not experienced fatigue, whereas the other respondents suffered from moderate and strong fatigue [88]. Research conducted by Nojomi et al. [89], Lowry et al. [90], Amaducci et al. [35] and Lai et al. [91] showed that over half of the students experienced moderate to severe fatigue, which is consistent with the findings of the above study [89]. A study conducted by Eslami [92] showed that half of the students had experienced fatigue. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to investigate the mediatory role of emotional control with respect to the control of anger, depression, and anxiety in the relationship between positive orientation and tiredness/fatigue occurring in a group of Polish nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study included 894 nursing students from six universities in Poland. A diagnostic survey was applied as the research method, and the data were collected using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), the Courtauld Emotional Control Scale (CECS) and the Positive Orientation Scale (SOP). The mean participant age was 20.73 years (SD = 1.81). More than half of the students in the study showed a low level of positive orientation. Correlational analyses revealed a significant negative correlation between positive orientation and tiredness/fatigue experienced by the students participating in the study (r = −0.336; p < 0.001), and correlation between positive orientation and the overall emotional control index (r = −0.317; p < 0.001), and the indices of control of anger (r = −0.154; p < 0.01), depression (r = −0.376; p < 0.001), and anxiety (r = −0.236; p < 0.01). Analysis of the results also revealed the occurrence of significant, positive links between the controlled emotions and their components and the tiredness/fatigue experienced by nursing students. It is important to take action associated with the prevention of tiredness/fatigue among students and to reinforce a positive orientation and the capacity to control emotions to effectively minimize the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on nursing students.
... Sleep disorders can be a factor in dissatisfaction with performance and feeling tired. The results of the present study are consistent by Marzieh N et al. [21] This study showed that there was a significant relationship between fatigue and sleep quality. [22] It can be said that not compensating for sleep deprivation over time can lead to fatigue and lack of motivation and affect their performance. ...
Article
Aims: Fatigue is a state in which a person's energy is completely depleted due to excessive physical or mental work. In addition to the importance of women workers and the effects of fatigue on them, limited studies have been conducted in this field in the world, especially in Iran. The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of fatigue and related factors among women workers in one of the cities of Iran. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed among women workers in Kashan in 2018. The sample size was 265 participants from 300 workers. The data collection tool was the multidimensional fatigue inventory questionnaire. Data were analyzed via SPSS version 16. Results: The lowest and highest total score was 38 and 78, respectively. The mean score of activity decrease was 11.78, which was the highest score among questionnaire. Factors such as overtime, number of children, and work experience showed a statistically significant relationship with the total fatigue score (P < 0.05). Conclusion: According to the results, a large percentage of participants had a high score of fatigue. Managements should identify and modify the factors affecting fatigue to reduce the worker's fatigue. It seems that further studies are needed to reveal the relationship between fatigue and other variables to provide a deeper understanding of the causes of fatigue.
... A study by Hicks et al. on the students of medical sciences showed that the prevalence of sleep problems was 71% (3). Nojomi et al. studied the sleep pattern of students and residents and showed that the workload was related to insomnia and poor sleep, so that the full-time students and residents had higher scores in insomnia and variety of sleep disorders (4). Landrigan et al. also showed that by intervening in the insomnia of interns and residents, the errors of these individuals could be reduced by up to 35.9% (5). ...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Objective: Insomnia is a universal phenomenon that many people experience and is characterized by difficulty in sleep initiation, maintaining sleep, waking up early in the morning, and inability to return to sleep. Due to its high prevalence and the effect of insomnia on the mental and physical performance of individuals, especially stu-dents, the present study aimed to investigate the relationship between transdiagnostic structures and insomnia disorder in students. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Population of this study was 400 medical students of Zanjan University of Medical Sciences and Zanjan University, Zanjan, Iran, who were selected by non-random sampling method. Research tools included demographic characteristics questionnaire, Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), 12-question Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), Anxiety Sensitivity Index-Third Edition (ASI-3), and Repetitive Thinking Questionnaire (RTQ). Research data were analyzed using LISREL software. Results: The average age of students was 21.54 years. Transdiagnostic constructs explained a total of 9% of insomnia disorders in students. Insomnia disorders in women were significantly higher than in men; moreover, in the single group was higher than in the married group. Conclusion: Transdiagnostic constructs can predict insomnia in students.
... III-Changing natural psychosomatic chronobiology after changes in sleeping protocols (i.e., staying up and waking up late). 5 IV. Reduced interpersonal relationships (social isolation), expansion of individualism (i.e., increased tendency towards being alone), weakness in teamworking, and disability/inability in communication with others. ...
... Comparable results were reported by Carskadon et al. (Carskadon, Acebo, and Jenni 2004). This is reasonable as the lesser the night sleep duration (with caffeine intake), the greater the daytime sleepiness (high chance of dozing off) (Nojomi, Ghalhe Bandi, and Kaffashi 2009). ...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives This study aimed to assess the sleep quality (habits and disorders) and the daytime sleepiness among medical students. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted during September 2018, through November 2018 at the Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Egypt. The study recruited undergraduate Egyptian and Malaysian students and applied a modified form of two questionnaires, namely the Sleep Habits and Life Style and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)”. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS. The results were expressed as frequency, percentage, and mean ± standard deviation (SD). Chi-square test was used to explore associations between categorical variables. An independent sample t-test was used to detect the mean differences between groups. Ordinal regression analyses were done on the ESS findings in relation to demographics and sleep habits. p-values<0.05 were accepted as statistically significant. Results The study included 899 medical students. Most of the participants were Egyptians (67%), rural residents (57.4%), and in the preclinical stage (79.5%). Males represented 66.0% of the study participants and participants average age (SD) was 21.98 (1.13) years. The average durations (SD) of night sleep were 7.3 (1.6) hours in work days and 8.7 (2.1) hours during the weekends. Both were significantly longer among young (<21 years-old) and preclinical students (p<0.05). Students had on average (SD) 1.33 (0.29) hours duration of napping, but 60% of the participants never or rarely scheduled for napping. Larger proportion of male and Malaysian students sometimes scheduled for napping more significantly than their peers (p<0.05). Only 16.24% of students reported that the cause of daytime napping was no enough sleep at night. The students reported sleep disorders of insomnia in the form of waking up too early, trouble falling asleep, or waking up at night with failure to re-sleep (31, 30, and 26%, respectively). Snoring (22.2%) and restless legs (22.0%) were also reported by the students. High chances of dozing off was reported by 22.02% of the participants, of which 10% used sleeping pills, 41.4% suffered psychological affection, and 34.8% reported life pattern affection. We found an increased chance of daytime sleepiness among males (0.430 times) and Egyptian (2.018 times) students. There was a decreased chance of daytime sleepiness in students from rural areas and those below 21-years-old (0.262 and 0.343 times, respectively). Absence of chronic diseases suffering was significantly associated with 5.573 more chance of daytime sleepiness or dozing off. In addition, enough and average sleep at night significantly decreased the chance of daytime sleepiness by 6.292 and 6.578, respectively, whereas daytime consumption of caffeinated beverages significantly decreased the chance of daytime sleepiness by 0.341. Conclusion There was unbalanced sleep duration in work days and weekends as well as lack of scheduling for napping among the students. Sleep disorders as insomnia, snoring, and restless legs were associated with excessive daytime sleepiness. Some students who suffered daytime sleepiness also underwent psychological and life pattern affection including taking sleeping pills. Enough and average sleep duration at night as well as daytime consumption of caffeinated beverages decreased the chance of daytime sleepiness.