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Sketch of a multimode AFM head (Bruker) equipped with its three electrodes electrochemical cell (A). Representation of the passive probe EC-AFM set-up (B). 

Sketch of a multimode AFM head (Bruker) equipped with its three electrodes electrochemical cell (A). Representation of the passive probe EC-AFM set-up (B). 

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The in-situ electrodeposition of polyaniline (PANI), one of the most attractive conducting polymers (CP), has been monitored performing electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) experiments. The electropolymerization of PANI on a Pt working electrode has been observed performing cyclic voltammetry experiments and controlling the evolution of...

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... situ EC-AFM observations were performed using an AFM system (Multimode, Bruker Inc.) equipped with a three electrode electrochemical cell (see Figure 2b). The WE was a Pt foil placed on the bottom of the cell; the reference electrode (RE) was an Ag/AgCl microelectrode and the counter electrode (CE) was a coiled Pt wire with a diameter of 0.25 mm. ...

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