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Simulated Power Tests for 111 Worker Sample

Simulated Power Tests for 111 Worker Sample

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This paper investigates the impact of a corporate wellness program on worker productivity using a panel of objective health and productivity data from 111 workers in five laundry plants. Although almost 90% of companies use wellness programs, existing research has focused on cost savings from insurance and absenteeism. We find productivity improvem...

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Context 1
... conducted several robustness checks to these main findings. First, Appendix Table A4 shows regression results using block-bootstrapped standard errors at the worker level (Cameron and Miller 2015), with similar results. Second, we carried out a series of placebo tests, randomly assigning employees to different groups, and randomly assigning intervention dates. ...
Context 2
... productivity values for these observations are calculated using the parameter estimates in model (4) of Table 3 plus an error term based on two components: worker-level and individual error terms. The two error terms are normally- distributed random variables with mean zero and their respective standard deviations in our real sample, and weighted based on the calculated intra-cluster (worker) correlation in our data (0.41). 3 The statistical power calculations using our sample size of 111 workers are provided in Table 4 for p- values of .05 and .10. As expected, statistical power is low, which helps explain the imprecision of our model estimates. ...

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... In laundry plants, wellness and post-program health participation make significant effect on work productivity. POS in well-being of the employees has positive effect about 10% on work productivity (Gubler et al., 2018). The empirical study on 88 teams from 13 health care organizations in the United Kingdom proved that POS influenced collective and personal work productivity (Lyubovnikova et al., 2018). ...
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... Flammer & Luo, 2017) that helps enhance employees' identification with the firm (Flammer & Kacperczyk, 2019). Moreover, employee-related CSR will improve employee engagement, mitigate adverse behavior, and increase productivity (Flammer & Luo, 2017;Gubler, Larkin, & Pierce, 2018). Both internal (e.g. ...
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... Second, these data would need to be linked to health claims data that would provide a more comprehensive mental health picture (i.e., counseling) than our medication data. In the United States, firms are barred from possessing such data about employees, so the researcher would need to separately acquire employer and health plan data and then link and de-identify them under HIPAA compliant procedures (see Gubler et al., 2018 for an example). Ultimately, rich evidence on mechanisms would seem to require complementary survey data on the experiences, emotions, and preferences of the employees in the sample. ...
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... Firms in both Denmark and the United States are typically legally barred from holding employee medical data, and medical data such as ours typically cannot be linked to individual data by researchers. Rare examples such as Gubler, Larkin, and Pierce (2018), which relies on policy changes at one small firm, typically do not have the statistical power to identify the net performance implications of policies that affect health. ...
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... Advocates claim that, due to better health and reduced absenteeism, company wellness programs achieve high productivity ROIs, substantial savings in employee benefit costs, and improvements in worker productivity (Baicker et al., 2010;Berry et al., 2010;Gubler et al., 2018). Baicker et al. (2010) report that every dollar spent on wellness programs achieves an average ROI of $3.27 for medical costs and $2.73 for absenteeism. ...
... Other research reports worker medical costs fall by $3.27 for every $1 spent on wellness programs and that absenteeism costs are reduced by $2.73 for every dollar spent (Kocakulah and Powers, 2015). Finally, Gubler, Larkin, and Pierce (2018) report that participation in wellness programs increases worker productivity by about ten percent. ...
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We examine organizational control in the context of wellness programs—organizational initiatives designed to improve the physical and mental health of employees. In a field study setting, we examine the associations of three different types of incentives (cash, gift cards, and tangible rewards) with wellness program performance. We find that employees who successfully complete program challenges are associated with greater weight loss. We also find participants choosing gift cards are associated with the greatest program success, even though cash rewards are selected more than twice as often as gift cards. Tangible rewards are the least frequently selected reward and are associated with lower performance than gift cards but relatively similar performance to cash. These results support theories of individual choice and motivation, and suggest that employees’ incentive choices are not necessarily aligned with the strongest motivational power.