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Siguan and sham points and simple illustration of the alimentary canal. (A) Needles were inserted perpendicularly to a depth of 1 cm at LI4 and 1.2 cm at LR3, or transversely and superficially to a depth of 0.5 cm at sham points. The needles at Siguan points were manually manipulated, but those at sham points were not. All the needles were retained for 30 min before withdrawal. (B) Abbreviations: SI, small intestine; AC, ascending colon; TC, transverse colon; DC, descending colon; SR, sigmoid/ rectum; and OB, outside body. 

Siguan and sham points and simple illustration of the alimentary canal. (A) Needles were inserted perpendicularly to a depth of 1 cm at LI4 and 1.2 cm at LR3, or transversely and superficially to a depth of 0.5 cm at sham points. The needles at Siguan points were manually manipulated, but those at sham points were not. All the needles were retained for 30 min before withdrawal. (B) Abbreviations: SI, small intestine; AC, ascending colon; TC, transverse colon; DC, descending colon; SR, sigmoid/ rectum; and OB, outside body. 

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Article
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This study examined whether manual acupuncture at the Siguan points (bilateral points LI4 and LR3) affects intestinal motility in healthy human subjects. Twenty healthy male subjects were randomly assigned either to real acupuncture (RA) at Siguan points or sham acupuncture (SA) groups in a crossover manner. All subjects underwent two experimental...

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Context 1
... first and second metatarsal bones ( Deng et al., 1997). A point on the dorsum of the hand, in the middle of the junction of the capital bone and the third metacarpal bone, and another point on the dorsum of the foot, in the middle of the junction of the lateral cuneiform bone and the third metatarsal bone, were selected bilaterally as sham points (Fig. 2A). The needles were inserted perpendicularly at Siguan points and superficially and transversely (toward the lateral side) at sham points in the order of right hand, left hand, right foot, and left foot. The depth of needle insertion was 1 cm at LI4, 1.2 cm at LR3, and 0.5 cm at the sham points. The needles inserted at Siguan points were ...
Context 2
... specialists in radiology, who were not informed of the study protocol, independently analyzed the radiographs. The numbers of radio-markers in the small intestine, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum at each time point were counted (Fig. 2B). Accordingly, the number of radio-markers that had already passed through the body was calculated by subtracting the number of radio-markers in the digestive tract from the 20 radio-markers taken. The speed of the radio-markers' passing through the alimentary canal was determined based on the distribution of the radio-markers in each ...

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... Possible explanations could be a reduction of pain as shown in adults [20], a beneficial effect on other visceral symptoms such as nausea which has been reduced by acupuncture in adults [21,22] and in children [23], an altered gastric motility [24] or changed gastric emptying as shown in adult patients with motility disorders [25]. Furthermore acupuncture affected constipation in children [26] even though gastric motility in healthy adult humans was not altered [27]. Finally a sedative effect of acupuncture could explain the reduction of colic as it has been demonstrated to promote sleep in adults [28]. ...
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