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Sign affixed to a residence containing quarantining people in Thủ Đức, Hồ Chí Minh City. "Center for Disease Control of Tam Phú Ward. NOTICE. This family has (a) member(s) quarantining at home. Please: do not come into contact with them. Note: family members must wear masks and stay at least 2 meters away from the person who is quarantining" Photo from Nongnghiep.vn.

Sign affixed to a residence containing quarantining people in Thủ Đức, Hồ Chí Minh City. "Center for Disease Control of Tam Phú Ward. NOTICE. This family has (a) member(s) quarantining at home. Please: do not come into contact with them. Note: family members must wear masks and stay at least 2 meters away from the person who is quarantining" Photo from Nongnghiep.vn.

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Vietnam was a remarkable COVID-19 success story, logging zero cases for months on end and keeping life close to normal for much of the population. For much of the pandemic, cases and deaths per 100,000 remained among the lowest in the world (Dong, Du and Gardner 2020, 533-534). But in late April 2021, the highly transmissible Delta variant began to...

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... f1s and now some f0s have been permitted to isolate at home (Tuổi Trẻ 2021) meaning it's becoming more common to have a virus sufferer or sufferers living in your alleyway or apartment building. Over the past few months, many residences with an f1 or an f2 (a close contact of an f1) quarantining inside have had red signs affixed to them by the local peoples' committee to warn the community of an infected or potentially infected person inside (Figure 4) city resident who underwent 14 days of self-isolation with such a sign on her door thought it an unnecessary step but one that she was powerless to object to, given it was mandated by the authorities. It is unknown whether these acts of COVID-19 signposting will continue as isolating at home becomes more commonplace. ...

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... COVID-19 is also an associated risk factor. Although Vietnam had succeeded in keeping zero cases in the first, second, and third waves of COVID-19, at the end of April 2021, the highly transmissible Delta strain began to spread, and the country faced a fourth wave (Tough 2021). In the fourth wave, the number of COVID-19 cases in Vietnam was around 100 times higher than the total of the previous three waves. ...
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... This shows that Vietnamese citizens chose not to actively participate in centralised peer surveillance. However, some individuals did request verbal confirmation from others of their having avoided of high-risk zones in the city before meeting them face-to-face (Tough 2021). Besides individual cooperation with the state, ongoing cooperation of medical staff, scientists, and various other professions-such as bus conductors, security guards, retailers, and other service providers-is also expected as pandemic policies and practices are in turn implemented and relaxed. ...
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