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Selenium concentrations (mg/l) in the inflow (NP-1) and outflow (NP-8) of the Nature Preserve for Feb. 2001 through Dec. 2003. Data is missing in 2003 for June (NP-8) and Sept. (both sites)

Selenium concentrations (mg/l) in the inflow (NP-1) and outflow (NP-8) of the Nature Preserve for Feb. 2001 through Dec. 2003. Data is missing in 2003 for June (NP-8) and Sept. (both sites)

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There is concern that elevated levels of selenium found in the source water of a newly formed wetland park in Las Vegas, Nevada, may have detrimental effects on local wildlife. In this study, we collected and analyzed water samples monthly for a three year period from the inflow and outflow of the system. We also gathered dominant aquatic plants an...

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Context 1
... in the water With few exceptions (described later) data from water samples collected over a three year period following wetland construction indicated that Se concentrations in the inflow and outflow were similar and reasonably consistent (Fig. 3). Not including the anomalous data, the mean concentration at the inflow was 19.6±4.0 μg/l (range 8.6-27.0) and at the outflow was 17.6±4.4 μg/l (range 9.9-24.7). If Se was effectively being removed from the source water, mitigating the relatively high concentrations, one would expect to see outflows with consistently lower ...
Context 2
... diluted the Se in the middle and lower ponds. The Monson Drain inflow (NP-1) and the upper pond (NP2) did not receive input from LVW and did not show anomalous patterns. However, levels at the outflow decreased below that typically found in the system during base flow conditions due to the diluting effect of the added LVW water into the system (Fig. ...

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... The content of Se in water at all sampling sites did not exceed the acceptable value of 2 lg Se L À1 at the time of sampling (Lemly, 1993). In the study of Pollard et al. (2007) the content of Se in water from wetland, which indirectly receives discharge of wastewaters, ranged from 9.9 to 24.7 lg Se L À1 . The values in polluted waters in the Arkansas River basin ranged from 1 to 240 lg Se L À1 (Canton and Van Derveer, 1997). ...
... The reason for that may be in its growth form, since this plant can take up elements through roots as well as through leaves, while the root uptake can be less effective in submerged plants. In the study of Pollard et al. (2007) the content of Se in the Scirpus californicus was 1.17, in Typha spp. 2.81 and in Scirpus maritimus 1.51 lg Se g À1 . ...
... We also observed some seasonal variations in the content of Se that are different between species as well as streams. In contrast, Pollard et al. (2007) did not find any seasonal variations. We can observe the trend of higher Se content in macrophytes in October and April (Fig. 4). ...
... Although Se uptake in A. repens was high, the bioconcentration factor was below 1 (data not shown). In a study by Pollard et al. (2007), the tissues of aquatic plants growing in a swamp with the concentration of 20 g Se L −1 at the inflow, contained lower amounts of Se, with values reaching 1.16 g Se g −1 in Scirpus californicus and 4.70 g Se g −1 in Najas marina. In Ruppia maritima exposed to concentrations of 1 mg Se(IV) L −1 Se, the final content after 21 days was 100 g Se g −1 (Bailey et al., 1995). ...
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... The amount of Se in the tissues of water plants growing in a swamp containing 20 μg Se L −1 , contained 1.16 μg Se g −1 in Scirpus californicus and 4.70 μg Se g −1 in Najas marina (Pollard et al. 2007). In Ruppia maritima exposed to concentrations around 6 mg Se L −1 , the content of Se was 200 μg Se g −1 (Bailey et al. 1995). ...
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... In other studies, macrophytes accumulated lower amount of Se from water containing 20 g Se L −1 – Chara spp. (Lin et al., 2002) and Scirpus californicus accumulated 1 g Se g −1 and Najas marina 5 g Se g −1 (Pollard et al., 2007). Mechora et al. (2011 found out that the content of Se in M. spicatum and C. demersum, exposed to 20 g Se(VI) L −1 , contained only around 0.7 g Se g −1 . ...
... In other studies, macrophytes accumulated lower amount of Se from water containing 20 g Se L −1 – Chara spp. (Lin et al., 2002) and Scirpus californicus accumulated 1 g Se g −1 and Najas marina 5 g Se g −1 (Pollard et al., 2007). Mechora et al. (2011 found out that the content of Se in M. spicatum and C. demersum, exposed to 20 g Se(VI) L −1 , contained only around 0.7 g Se g −1 . ...
... In other studies, macrophytes accumulated lower amount of Se from water containing 20 g Se L −1 – Chara spp. (Lin et al., 2002) and Scirpus californicus accumulated 1 g Se g −1 and Najas marina 5 g Se g −1 (Pollard et al., 2007). Mechora et al. (2011 found out that the content of Se in M. spicatum and C. demersum, exposed to 20 g Se(VI) L −1 , contained only around 0.7 g Se g −1 . ...
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... In other studies, macrophytes accumulated lower amount of Se from water containing 20 g Se L −1 – Chara spp. (Lin et al., 2002) and Scirpus californicus accumulated 1 g Se g −1 and Najas marina 5 g Se g −1 (Pollard et al., 2007). Mechora et al. (2011 found out that the content of Se in M. spicatum and C. demersum, exposed to 20 g Se(VI) L −1 , contained only around 0.7 g Se g −1 . ...
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