Figure - uploaded by Maheen Haider
Content may be subject to copyright.
Selected Hollywood Films.

Selected Hollywood Films.

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Using 11 high-grossing post-9/11 Hollywood films on terrorism and the Middle East, the author analyzes how films racialize Muslim identities in service to Islamophobia. This research brings together racialization theory with analysis of political ideologies that illustrate visualized racialized meanings on Muslim identities. The racialized portraya...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... generates a shorter list of n = 150 films. On the basis of the films' lifetime domestic gross at the box office, which establishes their popularity and American consumption, I select the top 11 for studying representations of Muslim identities in post-9/11 Hollywood films ( Table 1). ...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Introduction. There is a gap in the literature on the impact of the perceptions of a victim of an offense upon their forgiveness towards the offender, particularly when those perceptions include dehumanization. Objectives. The present cross-sectional exploratory study aimed at examining whether the perceptions of being treated in a dehumanized fash...

Citations

... Furthermore, the Veil as reinforced by mass mediated messages, not only reinforces the racializing's projections of Muslim Americans as Other and always-deserving of suspicion, but also reinforces within Muslims, an internalization of the acknowledgement that this is how the racializing see them. We see evidence of the power of the Veil and the role of mass media in structuring discursive legitimation of Muslim Otherness particularly after 9/11 (Haider 2020). Michelle D. Byng (2012) suggests that the phrase "the war on terror" was so commonplace post-9/11 that it became "the nomenclature of presidential speeches, news reports, the 9/11 Commission Report and Congressional hearings about the threat of homegrown Islamic terrorism" (p. ...
Article
This article engages in a theoretical discussion and application of Du Boisian double consciousness to understand the formation of the Muslim American self. Du Boisian double consciousness, and its three elements (the Veil, Twoness, and Second Sight) are used to understand phenomenological processes of Muslim American self-formation as being situated within and conditioned by structural contexts of racialization. By drawing on critical scholarship that highlights the operation of the Muslim racial project in contemporary U.S. contexts, I show how double consciousness emerges through the Othering of Muslim Americans at the macro, meso, and micro levels of society, which then defines them as outside of the U.S. national imaginary, and denies them their equal civic status as citizens of the state. By utilizing double consciousness to understand the Muslim American self as it is embedded in racialized U.S. contexts, this article fills a crucial gap in the literature by theoretically expanding on racialized processes of Muslim American identity formation in the racialized contexts of the United States.
Article
In my article, Racialization: A Defense of the Concept , I argue that ‘race’ fails as an analytic category and that we should think in terms of ‘racialization’ and ‘racialized groups’ instead. I define these concepts and defend them against a range of criticisms. In Rethinking Racialization: The Analytical Limits of Racialization , Deniz Uyan critiques my “theory of racialization”. However, I do not defend a theory of racialization; I defend the concept of racialization. I argue that racialization is a useful idea, but I do not advance a theory to explain or predict the phenomena it describes. While Uyan’s critique therefore misses its mark, it raises important questions about the explanatory scope of the racialization concept. Ironically, I may be even more skeptical of the prospects of any general theory of racialization than Uyan. I argue that while we ought to develop theories to explain particular instances of racialization, we should not develop a general theory of racialization, because it is simply too varied in its agents and their intents, the mechanisms through which it operates, and the outcomes it produces. While hope for any general theory of racialisation should be abandoned, I argue that the racialisation concept is still extremely useful. It offers a necessary alternative to race realist concepts, allowing us to point to the wide-ranging effects of belief in race without falsely implying that race itself is real. Uyan does not focus on my arguments against racial realism. However, the theoretical failures and normative risks of racial realism motivate my defense of the racialization concept. In this paper, I reiterate my arguments against racial realism and offer further defense of the concepts of ‘racialization’ and ‘racialized group’.