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Sea level change time series at all analysed stations using satellite altimetry and tide gauges with the best fitting seasonal variation curves (seasonal curves -the function model).

Sea level change time series at all analysed stations using satellite altimetry and tide gauges with the best fitting seasonal variation curves (seasonal curves -the function model).

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... satellite altimetry and tide gauge time series and the fitted seasonal curves (function model) are shown in Figure 2. ...
Context 2
... satellite altimetry and tide gauge time series and the fitted seasonal curves (function model) are shown in Figure 2. ...

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... The basic prerequisite is the closest proximity of available TG [25,26]. The relative movements v R between a GNSS station and a TG should be taken into account [27]. GNSS stations located on the coast provide the best neighbourhood. ...
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