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Screenshot from the I Am Green Facebook application 

Screenshot from the I Am Green Facebook application 

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Accepted proposal for a workshop held at the 6th International Conference on Pervasive Computing, May 19th, 2008, Sydney, Australia

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... Persuasive technology is a branch of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and its aim is to change the thinking and behavior of users in constructive and positive manner without any deception and coercion [3] [4]. Persuasive technology is very common with health, politics, safe driving, education, environment and public relation as its key areas [5] [6] [7]. Nowadays, mobile phones are ubiquitous and a key platform for persuasive technology and personalized learning to be used in them [8] [9]. ...
Article
Our research studies the impact of different adaptive learning strategies on improving students study behavior. We have developed an e-learning software system that assists students to improve their study behavior from two different perspectives. In both of the perspectives, our e-learning system has different functionalities and implements different adaptive learning techniques. In the first approach, e-learning software system uses mobile app that through automatic reminders and different screen widgets, persuades the students to stay in touch with study and keep themselves up to date about different class activities. In the second approach, e-learning system uses automated web based SMS application for automatically sending timely and related messages to different students in order to keep them aware of their study progress and different class activities. Both approaches were thoroughly tested on undergraduate students and at the end interesting results were revealed about different adaptive and persuasive techniques that would help educationalist and software engineers in streamlining the process of mobile learning in future.
... As experts in context, bicyclists dynamically select varied routes through city and in the process collectively contribute a rich set of data; ostensibly richer, more varied, and thus more representative to that context than if the data was collected by the engineers, computer scientists or designers developing the Biketastic system. One catchphrase used in the literature for such work is " citizen science " [27,62]; work under this label tends to emphasize the democratic potential of involving end users in data collection, a theme shared with community environmental information systems [e.g.,32,51]. ...
Conference Paper
With the recent growth in sustainable HCI, now is a good time to map out the approaches being taken and the intellectual commitments that underlie the area, to allow for community discussion about where the field should go. Here, we provide an empirical analysis of how sustainable HCI is defining itself as a research field. Based on a corpus of published works, we identify (1) established genres in the area, (2) key unrecognized intellectual differences, and (3) emerging issues, including urgent avenues for further exploration, opportunities for interdisciplinary engagement, and key topics for debate.
... As well, several special interest groups and panels have occurred at the 2007 and 2008 conference, Mankoff et al. [20], and Nathan et al. [22]. In addition to the CHI venue, recent ubicomp and pervasive workshops continue to explore the role pervasive technology might play in facilitating more sustainable ways of being, for example Foth et al. [11], Hasbrouck, et al. [15]. and Paulos et al. [27]. ...
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This paper takes up the problem of understanding why we preserve some things passionately and discard others without thought. We briefly report on the theoretical literature relating to this question, both in terms of existing literature in HCI, as well as in terms of related literatures that can advance the understanding for the HCI community. We use this reading to refine our frameworks for understanding durability in digital artifice as an issue of sustainable interaction design in HCI. Next, we report in detail on our ongoing work in collecting personal inventories of digital artifice in the home context. We relate our prior and most current personal inventories collections to the framework that owes to our reading of the theoretical literature. Finally, we summarize the theoretical implications and findings of our personal inventories work in terms of implications for the design of digital artifice in a manner that is more durable.
... Sustainability in and through design have become critical topics in HCI [e.g. 1,4,10,13,15,16,17,25,26,31,32,40] promising necessary change for both our natural environment and designed systems. This work is roughly categorized as building systems that are 1) 'more green', and/or 2) improve 'green behavior' [25,32]. ...
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Sustainable HCI is now a recognized area of human-computer interaction drawing from a variety of disciplinary approaches, including the arts. How might HCI researchers working on sustainability productively understand the discourses and practices of ecologically engaged art as a means of enriching their own activities? We argue that an understanding of both the history of ecologically engaged art, and the art-historical and critical discourses surrounding it, provide a fruitful entry-point into a more critically aware sustainable HCI. We illustrate this through a consideration of frameworks from the arts, looking specifically at how these frameworks act more as generative devices than prescriptive recipes. Taking artistic influences seriously will require a concomitant rethinking of sustainable HCI standpoints - a potentially useful exercise for HCI research in general.
... The intersection of human-computer interaction and environmental sustainability represents a nascent and growing area of interest in the HCI community [e.g. 1, 2, 3, 5]. Moreover, the combined application of situated visualizations and pervasive computing technology presents a compelling context to persuade individuals and communities to intentionally act in more sustainable ways [3]. This design space is particularly well suited to support exploration into eco-visualization (EV), which we have elsewhere described as " any kind of interactive device targeted at revealing energy use in order to promote more sustainable behaviors or foster positive attitudes towards sustainable practices " [5]. ...
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In this workshop paper, we describe the design, implementation, and early results of an eco-visualization of Indiana University Bloomington campus dormitory energy and water consumption. We (i) present initial results of our ongoing study examining the role eco-visualizations might play in impacting dormitory communities' behavior, (ii) discuss what these findings suggest with respect to how situated displays could help improve community uptake in future work and (iii) describe an emerging conceptual design direction with an eye toward the intersection of situated displays and social incentive.
Chapter
According to a recent statistical analysis conducted in 2018, more than 40% of the population has no reading or writing skills especially in rural areas of Pakistan. On the contrary, the mobile phone users have grown at a very steep rate even with a stagnant literacy rate. We formed a user-driven approach to research, develop and test a prototype mobile application that could be used to teach illiterates basic reading, writing and counting skills without using traditional schooling techniques. This first of a kind application provided the user the ability to customize their own learning plan. Focusing on native language Urdu, the application teaches them the required skill they need for daily life activities such as writing their own name, scenario-based calculations, identifying commonly used words.
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More people are traveling than ever before. This intense and disproportionate growth in tourism may, however, generate negative environmental and social effects, especially on islands. In order to address this issue, this article presents the design and evaluation of Há-Vita, an interactive web platform, whose goal is to foster awareness of local nature and folk knowledge and create connections between locals and visitors. We explored these design goals through different research methods, such as user studies with tourists in hotel lobbies, as well as focus groups consisting of two different groups of local residents and a group of visitors. Theoretically, Há-Vita is grounded in the concept of “community-based tourism ventures,” which is concerned with environmental preservation via ecotourism practices and, at the same time, the empowerment of local communities. Furthermore, the design rationale of the platform is also inspired by the authenticity theory, which examines tourists’ pursuit of meaningful interactions with locals. Our results indicate that, despite time constraints (for visitors), locals and visitors were willing to interact with each other as they acknowledged authentic benefits in such interaction. Furthermore, our focus groups with locals have shown the potential to stimulate different levels of local empowerment based on the community-based tourism framework in the design iterations of Há-Vita.
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This study takes place from the idea that the personal usage of mobile technologies can bring positive outcomes to the user and to their society in an indirect way. Technologies studied in this work are defined as persuasive technologies (Fogg, 1997) because they are intentionally designed to modify the users’ attitude or behavior. This research is aimed to evaluate if the intention to use the application can be influenced by positive attitudes toward technology, by the persuasive power of the application and by the perceived fun. Participants (N = 118; M = 55; F = 63; mean age = 27.4; range age = 15–69) filled in an online questionnaire that was partly based on the Media and Technology Usage and Attitude Scale (MTUAS – Rosen et al., 2013). An additional eight items were added to the scale, aimed at evaluating participants’ technophobia, technophilia, perceived technology pervasiveness and perceived persuasive power of technology. By using linear regression analysis, it was found that the application’s informational power and the perceived entertainment positively influenced the usage intention. Another interesting result, obtained through ANOVA, concerns a generational difference: baby boomers tended to trust more the fact that the single individual action through the application can have an effective impact on the environment. These results represent a basis for future in-depth investigations about socially relevant use of the ICT.
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Persuasive technologies are tools for motivating behaviour change using persuasive strategies. socially-driven persuasive technologies employ three common socially-oriented persuasive strategies in many health domains: competition, social comparison, and cooperation. Research has shown the possibilities for socially-driven persuasive interventions to backfire by demotivating behaviour, but we lack knowledge about how the interventions could motivate or demotivate behaviours. To close this gap, we studied 1898 participants, specifically Socially-oriented strategies and their comparative effectiveness in socially-driven persuasive health interventions that motivate healthy behaviour change. The results of a thematic analysis of 278 pages of qualitative data reveal important strengths and weaknesses of the individual socially-oriented strategies that could facilitate or hinder their effectiveness at motivating behaviour change. These include their tendency to simplify behaviours and make them fun, challenge people and make them accountable, give a sense of accomplishment and their tendency to jeopardize user’s privacy and relationships, creates unnecessary tension, and reduce self-confidence and self-esteem, and provoke a health disorder and body shaming, respectively. We contribute to the health informatics community by developing 15 design guidelines for operationalizing the strategies in persuasive health intervention to amplify their strengths and overcome their weaknesses.
Article
Environmental sustainability demands civic action through both changes in individual and community behaviors in addition to national and international agreements and cooperation. In moral appeals to the environment, individuals are often called upon to behave in “good” ways—reduce, reuse, recycle—to “save the planet.” Behavior, and our attitudes about it, is therefore an important component to ongoing sustainability efforts. This pilot study, conducted in Fall 2009, brings together research methods in sociolinguistics and rhetorical studies to examine the discourses that students produce when describing issues and practices concerning sustainability. In interviews with 15 students in an earth sustainability general education core, our study found that students were knowledgeable about environmental issues and expressed intentions to engage in sustainable behaviors. Yet, students produced accommodating discourses when addressing competing demands on their time and resources. The sociolinguistic analysis of interview data shows a disassociation from environmental issues at the symbolic level of language use. The rhetorical analysis shows that this disassociation manifests as guilt, largely because when choosing between various moral appeals in their social context, students are left without tangible direction for engaging in new sustainable behaviors.