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Schumann resonance energy peaks (adapted from Polk 1983)  

Schumann resonance energy peaks (adapted from Polk 1983)  

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The possibility that conditions on the Sun and in the Earth’s magnetosphere can affect human health at the Earth’s surface has been debated for many decades. This work reviews the research undertaken in the field of heliobiology, focusing on the effect of variations of geomagnetic activity on human cardiovascular health. Data from previous research...

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... study performed by Stoupel et al. (1995) discussed in the previous section also investigated the relationship between suicide and geomagnetic activity param- eters. All suicides registered in the state of Israel (N = 2,359) for a 108-month period between 1980 and 1989 were analysed and compared with the total number of deaths (15,601) and deaths from MI (1,573) in a large university hospital over a period of 180 months (1974)(1975)(1976)(1977)(1978)(1979)(1980)(1981)(1982)(1983)(1984)(1985)(1986)(1987)(1988)(1989). The monthly suicide rate was significantly correlated with geomagnetic activity (r = -0.22, ...
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... the Earth's surface and the ionosphere ( Schumann 1952). The so-called Schumann Resonance (SR) signals are electromagnetic resonances of the global Earth-ionosphere (quasi) spherical-shell cavity ( Barr et al. 2000). These res- onances are excited by global lightning activity and are measured in the lower ELF band between 5 and 60 Hz, as shown in Fig. 5. Schumann showed that the resonance frequencies are given by an equation of the form f n ¼ 7:49ðnðn þ 1ÞÞ ...

Citations

... CMEs and resulting electromagnetic levels have been linked to short-term fluctuations in human health, immune function, morbidity, and mortality called heliobiology [83]. One review concluded that 10-15% of the population are predisposed to the adverse effects of geomagnetic variations [84]. Patients with multiple sclerosis show enhanced hospital admission during periods of geomagnetic disturbance [85]. ...
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Unexpected outcomes are usually associated with interventions in complex systems. Excess winter mortality (EWM) is a measure of the net effect of all competing forces operating each winter, including influenza(s) and non-influenza pathogens. In this study over 2400 data points from 97 countries are used to look at the net effect of influenza vaccination rates in the elderly aged 65+ against excess winter mortality (EWM) each year from the winter of 1980/81 through to 2019/20. The observed international net effect of influenza vaccination ranges from a 7.8% reduction in EWM estimated at 100% elderly vaccination for the winter of 1989/90 down to a 9.3% increase in EWM for the winter of 2018/19. The average was only a 0.3% reduction in EWM for a 100% vaccinated elderly population. Such outcomes do not contradict the known protective effect of influenza vaccination against influenza mortality per se—they merely indicate that multiple complex interactions lie behind the observed net effect against all-causes (including all pathogen causes) of winter mortality. This range from net benefit to net disbenefit is proposed to arise from system complexity which includes environmental conditions (weather, solar cycles), the antigenic distance between constantly emerging circulating influenza clades and the influenza vaccine makeup, vaccination timing, pathogen interference, and human immune diversity (including individual history of host-virus, host-antigen interactions and immunosenescence) all interacting to give the observed outcomes each year. We propose that a narrow focus on influenza vaccine effectiveness misses the far wider complexity of winter mortality. Influenza vaccines may need to be formulated in different ways, and perhaps administered over a shorter timeframe to avoid the unanticipated adverse net outcomes seen in around 40% of years.
... Experiments described in [34] have been performed with the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Currently, the heliobiology (study of the Sun effects, geomagnetic activity and EM fields on biology) is well-accepted scientific branch with a large number of publications [35], [36]. ...
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The zymase activity of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae is sensitive to environmental parameters and is therefore used as a microbiological sensor for water quality assessment, ecotoxicological characterization or environmental monitoring. Comparing to bacterial bioluminescence approach, this method has no toxicity, excludes usage of genetically modified microorganisms, and enables low-cost express analysis. This work focuses on measuring the yeast fermentation dynamics based on multichannel pressure sensing and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Measurement results are compared with each other in terms of accuracy, reproducibility and ease of use in the field conditions. It has been shown that EIS provides more information about ionic dynamics of metabolic processes and requires less complex measurements. The conducted experiments demonstrated the sensitivity of this approach for assessing biophotonic phenomena, non-chemical water treatments and impact of environmental stressors.
... Geomagnetic Correlates. Considerable effort has been made over the years to determine whether fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field, which can often be influenced by the solar wind (Campbell, 1997;Lyon, 2000), might have an effect upon human health and behavior (Close, 2012;Palmer et al., 2006;Zenchenko & Breus, 2021). This may lead one to wonder: Might psi phenomena possibly exhibit any correlation with geomagnetic activity? ...
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Many experiments have been conducted over the past eight decades to explore whether the ostensible psychic ability of psychokinesis (PK, or "mind over matter") might be a genuine human potential, and the most extensive of these have involved attempts to mentally influence the output of electronic, binary-bit random number generators (RNGs). Research of this type can generally be divided into two lines: proof-oriented (concerned with the accumulation and statistical evaluation of data from controlled experiments designed specifically to test for the presence of PK effects on the microscopic scale) and process-oriented (concerned with conducting exploratory experiments designed to systematically vary certain test conditions in order to search for and identify any physical, biological, and psychological factors which might have a role in improving or moderating PK effects). To help orient novice investigators and cross-disciplinary researchers who may be considering work along these lines (as well as offer some initial guiding insight on possible directions for future research), this paper provides a general review of some of the notable proof- and process-oriented findings that have been obtained to date in experimental microscopic PK research using RNGs. The review generally indicates that although a considerable amount of proof-oriented data for micro-PK has accumulated over the years, the relatively sparse amount of process-oriented data available at present leaves a lot of open questions regarding the underlying factors involved, providing ample opportunity for novice investigators and cross-disciplinary researchers to make valuable research contributions in the future.
... Geomagnetic Correlates. Considerable effort has been made over the years to determine whether fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field, which can often be influenced by the solar wind (Campbell, 1997;Lyon, 2000), might have an effect upon human health and behavior (Close, 2012;Palmer et al., 2006;Zenchenko & Breus, 2021). This may lead one to wonder: Might psi phenomena possibly exhibit any correlation with geomagnetic activity? ...
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Journal of Scientific Exploration Whole Issue PDF
... Reviewing the literature on the health effects of geomagnetic interference, Palmer et al. suggests the following conclusions: 1) geomagnetic disturbances have a greater impact on people in higher (northern) geomagnetic latitudes; 2) abnormally high geomagnetic activity affects the health of the cardiovascular system; 3) abnormally low geomagnetic activity has a negative effect on health; 4) Disrupted geomagnetic activity has a negative impact on the health of about 10-15 % of people living in the study areas. 5) HRV is negatively correlated with geomagnetic interference [15], [11]. Thus, research findings support the hypothesis that environmental magnetic activity affects psychophysical processes that can affect people in a variety of ways, depending on their sensitivity, health status, and ability to self-regulate [12]. ...
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Daily energy expenditure includes resting metabolism (RMR), endogenous thermogenesis (or thermal effects of food), and energy expenditure associated with exercise. RMR depends on body weight, age, gender, genetic factors, medications used and health status. Every living organism is affected by external factors. Fluctuations in magnetic fields can affect almost every biological system more or less, depending on the characteristics of the particular biological system and magnetic fluctuations. Environmental energy phenomena affect psychophysical processes that can affect people in a variety of ways, depending on their sensitivity, health status, and ability to self-regulate. The aim of this study: to investigate the correlations between basal metabolic rate in humans with different age, gender, BMI and local Earth magnetic field activity. Information on gas metabolism during respiration was obtained by indirect calorimetry where the gas flow was continuously analysed. O2 consumption and CO2 emissions were continuously analysed. The best quality 5 min section was selected from the 15 min recording (automatically selected by the computer). The results were analysed and mean resting metabolic rate (M_RMR) was calculated. Investigations of metabolic rate were performed in Lithuanian, Druskininkai, Medical SPA Center ,,UPA”. Power of spectral density of Local Geo Magnetic field (LGMF) was calculated in 0.32 to 36 Hz frequency range from the Lithuanian (GCI003) magnetometer for East – West direction (E-W). 395 persons were investigated: 116 men and 279 women. All participants were divided into two groups according gender. Women and men groups were divided again into two groups according mean age, the mean was 46 years. Was analysed correlations in women younger (≤ 46 years) and older (> 46 years) groups and the same for men younger (≤ 46 years) and older (> 46 years) groups. On the next step all women and all men, then younger women group, older women group, younger men group and older men group was divided according BMI mean (29), with less than ≤ 29 BMI and with more than > 29 BMI. On the basis of obtained results, we can conclude, that correlations between LGMF and basal metabolic rate features are negative. More expressed negative correlations are seen in persons with smaller BMI. With age negative correlations with LGMF decrease in men group and increase in women group. Sensitivity of persons of different gender to LGMF – differ.
... In order to study the possible effect of geomagnetic activity (GMA) and changes in cosmic ray intensity (CRI) on the physiological state of the human body, direct and indirect indicators have been used [1]. Direct indicators are physiological parameters that can be objectively verified and are obtained by direct measurements from the patient (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, reaction time, etc.), by diagnostic methods in the laboratory, or by tissue analysis. ...
... They are usually analyzed in retrospective studies and involve a large number of individuals over a period of several years. However, when interpreting these indicators, other possible parameters must be taken into account, such as season, weather, demographic factors, working environment, diet, and so forth, which are likely to affect the measurements [1]. ...
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It is well known that the various manifestations of space weather can influence a wide range of human activities, from technological systems to human health. Various earlier, as well as more recent multi-disciplinary heliobiological and biometeorological studies have revealed that the human organism is sensitive to environmental physical activity changes and reacts to them through variations of the physiological parameters of the human body. This paper constitutes an overview of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens investigations in regard to the possible effect of solar, geomagnetic, and cosmic ray activity on human physiological parameters. The Athens Cosmic Ray and Solar Physics Groups collaborated with scientific teams from different countries, statistically processing and analyzing data related to human physiological parameters (such as mean heart rate, arterial systolic, and diastolic pressure), or the number of incidents of different types of cardiac arrhythmias and so forth, in relation to data concerning and describing geomagnetic activity (geomagnetic indices Ap and Dst) and variations in cosmic ray intensity (Forbush decreases and cosmic ray intensity enhancements). In total, four projects were carried out concerning data from different geographical regions (Baku, Azerbaijan; Kosice, Slovakia; Tbilisi, Georgia; Piraeus, Greece), covering different time periods and time scales (daily data or yearly data), and referring to different groups of individuals (selected healthy persons or random persons). The studies concluded with interesting results concerning the possible influence of geomagnetic and cosmic ray activity on the human physiological state.
... Because solar activity influences solar winds before impacting the geomagnetic environment of Earth, we expect the effect of solar activity to be delayed by at least several days. 22 Still, there is limited understanding of when the most relevant exposure window of geomagnetic activity for BP would be. Therefore, we explored average 1-day (ie, day of BP measurement) to 28-day exposure windows in 4-day increments. ...
... Although exposure to solar activity is ubiquitous, its intensity and subsequent human health effects varies by latitude because of variations in the polarity and orientation of the Earth's magnetic field. 22 Because all participants in this study were in the Boston area, there is minimal misclassification of the exposure in this respect. Given the novelty of solar activity as Figure 3. Association of solar and geomagnetic activity with systolic blood pressure after adjusting for air pollutants (particulate matter ≤2.5 µm, black carbon, particle number, and logarithmic β-activity). ...
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Background Since solar activity and related geomagnetic disturbances modulate autonomic nervous system activity, we hypothesized that these events would be associated with blood pressure (BP). Methods and Results We studied 675 elderly men from the Normative Aging Study (Boston, MA) with 1949 BP measurements between 2000 and 2017. Mixed‐effects regression models were used to investigate the association of average 1‐day (ie, day of BP measurement) to 28‐day interplanetary magnetic field intensity, sunspot number, and a dichotomized measure of global geomagnetic activity (K p index) in 4‐day increments with diastolic and systolic BP. We adjusted for meteorological conditions and other covariates associated with BP, and in additional models adjusted for ambient air pollutants (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm, black carbon, and particle number) and ambient particle radioactivity. There were positive associations between interplanetary magnetic field, sunspot number, and K p index and BP that were greatest with these exposures averaged over 16 through 28 days before BP measurement. An interquartile range increase of 16‐day interplanetary magnetic field and sunspot number and higher K p index were associated with a 2.5 (95% CI, 1.7‒3.2), 2.8 (95% CI, 2.1‒3.4), and 1.7 (95% CI, 0.8‒2.5) mm Hg increase, respectively, for diastolic BP as well as a 2.1 (95% CI, 0.7‒3.6), 2.7 (95% CI, 1.5‒4.0), and 0.4 (95% CI, −1.2 to 2.1) mm Hg increase, respectively, for systolic BP. Associations remained after adjustment for ambient air pollutants and ambient particle radioactivity. Conclusions Solar activity and solar‐driven geomagnetic disturbances were positively associated with BP, suggesting that these natural phenomena influence BP in elderly men.
... Ionizing radiation is much more difficult to avoid than non-ionizing radiation, such as infrared (IR), visible (VIS) or ultraviolet (UV) light, which can easily be shielded out of an environment (Dunbar 2019). Mounting evidence on the biological effects of space weather suggests also that geomagnetic disturbances are an environmental risk factor to humans (Palmer et al. 2006;Dimitrova 2008;Dimitrova et al. 2009;Vieira et al. 2019). The geomagnetic activity (GMA) shows a depen- Fig. 6. ...
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The far-reaching impact of the Sun on Earth’s climate and people’s health and well-being is not consensual or fully understood, with empirical literature stressing the need to expand our knowledge of such relationships. Here, the interplay between solar activity (SA), climate and its cascading effects on all-cause mortality were examined at several timescales. To this end, the parish records of Braga (1700–1880) and Torre de Moncorvo (1700–1850), in two different geographic locations of northern Portugal (SW Europe), were used. Crude mortality rates (CMRs) and Winter–Summer ratios (W/S) were computed to characterize mortality patterns/trends and couple them with potential relevant drivers: total solar irradiance (TSI) as a proxy of SA, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and key historical events. What emerged, albeit incomplete, was a complex picture of death deeply embedded in people’s physical and socioeconomic environments, at a time when ubiquitous poverty was the most basic prerequisite for morbidity. After identifying the positive mortality episodes in both municipalities, higher incidence was found in periods of weakened SA (normal/Grand minima). Standard inference statistics were used to estimate the significance of the observations. The larger CMR peaks matched with wars, but also with known wide-ranging mortality crises, seeming to have been triggered by major agricultural production shortfalls, followed by substantial increases in food prices, which, in turn, were driven by climate deterioration, including extreme weather occurrences. The result was social unrest, famines and outbreaks of infectious diseases, heightening the death toll. The influence of prominent solar/climate variations was investigated using wavelet transform coherence analysis (WTC). The results showed (multi)decadal oscillations in both (TSI and NAO) regulating somehow mortality. But WTC also estimated SA signals in low-frequency mortality dynamics disguised by time-varying determinants in which distinct players of space weather might have been implicated.
... Results of the experiments extend studies that report the effects with changes in GMA are observed also at lower latitudes at times of strong GMA (Palmer et al., 2006) and confirm the existence of GMA as the specific risk factor , (Stoupel, 2019). ...
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Evolutionarily, a human organism is adapted to the natural geomagnetic environment and its slight alterations. However, during geomagnetic storms (GMSs), the strength of the geomagnetic field (GMF) sharply increased hundreds of times and can pose a serious threat to people. We examine the effects of controlled compensation in the time-varying components of the GMF, using a specially created experimental setup with electrically shielding solutions, providing an electromagnetically quiet environment. The measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) on 25 healthy young male volunteers was carried out in the laboratory using the experimental setup at different levels of outdoor geomagnetic activity (GMA). The geomagnetic K-index was used to characterize the magnitude of GMSs; volunteers were tested during quiet magnetic days (K=1-3), days with K=4, and days with GMSs (K≥5) in the period of solar cycle maximum. During quiet magnetic days, the comparison between HRV baseline values with values measured under GMF time-varying components compensation mode (CM) did not reveal any changes. On days with K=4 some HRV indices shifted from their initial values, but it was statistically not significant. However, on days with GMSs statistically significant changes in SDNN* (p=0.033) and LF* (p=0.011) indices of HRV were observed in the GMS CM compared to their baseline values. The experiments showed that GMSs cause a sensitive reaction of the heart rate regulatory mechanism, the effect of which can be canceled in the GMS CM. The efficiency of the used technology is supported by the results of this study. * SDNN (Standard Deviation Normal to Normal R-R of cardiointervals), LF (Low frequency spectral band of cardiointervals).
... На сегодняшний день накоплено достаточно наблюдений о влиянии космических факторов на биосферу, но механизмы их действия мало изучены [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8]. Такие экологические воздействия обладают выраженным биотропным эффектом, который приводит к биохимическим и физиологическим перестройкам живых организмов [9] и проявляется не только на уровне индивидуального цикла развития, но также оказывает влияние на характер развития последующих поколений в целом [10]. ...
Article
At present impacts exerted by heliogeophysic factors on different living organisms are being examined more and more intensely. Over the last decade, it has been detected that meteorological factors play an important role in formation of adap- tation mechanisms in living systems. Sun and earth interaction is also known to directly influence rheological properties of human blood, both in a healthy body and in case there are chronic non-communicable diseases. Given that, impacts exerted by “cosmic weather” on living organisms, people in particular, are a stimulus to perform profound studies on reactions oc- curring as a response to effects produced by solar and geomagnetic activity, first of all, solar flares and magnetic storms. At present the most widely used approach to determining influences exerted by the Earth magnetic field on biologi- cal systems involves searching for correlations between different parameters of living organisms functioning and geo- magnetic indexes. Our research goal was to assess dependence between enzymatic activity of antioxidant protection system, exemplified by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, and geomagnetic field disturbances. The research focused on examining blood samples taken from conditionally healthy volunteers living in Nizhniy Nov- gorod region. SOD and catalase activity were determined in blood erythrocytes with spectrophotometry. Geomagnetic dis- turbances force was determined as per planetary Kp-index value. The research established a statistically significant correlation between SOD and catalase activity and a value of geo- magnetic field disturbance; this correlation allows making an indirect assumption that geomagnetic conditions directly in- fluence superoxide radical production in a body. Therefore, a change in superoxide radical production is a way for the geomagnetic field to influence living organisms. Activation of free radical oxidation can make for both occurrence and more intense clinical course of several diseases (espe- cially cardiovascular and neuropsychic ones). So, in future it is advisable to assess reactivity of antioxidant protection sys- tem as a response to geomagnetic fluctuations in case there are pathologic changes in a body.