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Scheme of sampling stations in Lake Sevan in 2018.

Scheme of sampling stations in Lake Sevan in 2018.

Context in source publication

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... phytoplankton samples were collected with a 4-L Molchanov bathometer from the surface to the bottom every 1-5 m in the middle of July 2018 at two transects in Malyi (MS) and Bolshoi (BS) Sevan and one semitransect in BS and in the part overgrown with macrophytes (1) and open (2) part of the shallow bay in MS formed after the water-level rise (Fig. 1). To study the vertical phytoplankton distribution, samples were collected at different horizons of the water column every 5-10 m at three deepwater stations (I-5, II-13 and 20). Samples were concentrated in turn by direct filtration under weak pressure through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 5 and 1.2 μm to determine the ...

Citations

... A non-indigenous haplotype of Daphnia magna is detected in Sevan Lake (Armenia) [68,143], which led to changes in the fish population [144], as often happens with the introduction of alien species of invertebrates [145]. Such cases are singular, and it is impossible to separate each directionality of the invasion for each case. ...
Article
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Non-indigenous species may pose a threat to native ecosystems worldwide. In aquatic environments, invasives may have a negative impact on human food security and livelihoods. Several water fleas (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Cladocera) are notorious invasive alien species influencing large freshwater lake systems and even inland seas. In the current review, we discuss the state of knowledge regarding non-indigenous species in the Cladocera and their invasiveness potential in different continents. We argue that the potential impacts and occurrence of cladoceran exotics may be higher than generally assumed. We critically review 79 cases from literature sources, involving 61 cladoceran taxa where records outside of their natural distribution ranges were previously interpreted as invasions. We assessed the probability of natural range expansions versus human-mediated introductions and we discuss several major corridors of invasion. We estimate human-mediated transportations for at least 43 taxa (out of 61; ca 70%), while other cases can be seen as natural expansions of their distribution ranges (not necessarily/not likely human-mediated) and/or taxonomical confusion. We confirm non-indigenous presence in recipient regions for at least 41 cladoceran taxa, of which several are true invasives (i.e., with negative impacts on native ecosystems). The majority are zooplankters with effects on pelagic freshwater ecosystems, yet we also report on introductions by littoral taxa. We argue that cryptic introductions of cladocerans are taking place on a global scale, yet they remain under the radar. We highlight several striking case studies, such as the Ponto–Caspian onychopods that have invaded the Baltic Sea and the Laurentian Great Lakes, and several clones of the anomopod genera Daphnia and Bosmina that have successfully colonised new environments, causing equilibria shifts in native aquatic worlds. At the same time, we dispel some myths about taxa that were misconstrued as invasive in certain localities. Based on our review, the first of its kind for freshwater zooplankton, future environmental monitoring tools including molecular techniques and detailed surveys with rigorous and critical taxonomical assessments may help to provide a clearer picture on the extent of invasiveness of cladocerans.
Article
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The resilience of natural systems may be severely compromised by anthropogenic influences. In this paper, the principal anthropogenic influences on the ecosystem of the Armenian highland lake Sevan during the past century are identified. The diversity and severity of the pressures were influenced by national priorities and the catchment's growth. Changes in the lake's morphometry and the littoral's morphology, as well as unsustainable usage of the lake's fish resources, were among the repercussions. They are discussed depending on how each sort of disturbance affects the ecosystem. Although the timing and degree of each stressor were specified, identifying the direct effects of each stressor was often challenging. The current management decisions and future threats to the lake's ecosystem are discussed. This article describes the history of the anthropogenic change of Lake Sevan and, using it as an example, assesses the ecological footprint of people on natural resources and their repercussions.