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Rubin's vase (sometimes referred to as "The Two Face, One Vase Illusion") depicts the silhouette of a vase in black and the profiles of two inward-looking faces in white. The figure-ground distinction made by the brain during visual perception determines which image is seen. Ittelson, W. H. (1969). Visual Space Perception, Springer Publishing Company, LOCCCN 60-15818 

Rubin's vase (sometimes referred to as "The Two Face, One Vase Illusion") depicts the silhouette of a vase in black and the profiles of two inward-looking faces in white. The figure-ground distinction made by the brain during visual perception determines which image is seen. Ittelson, W. H. (1969). Visual Space Perception, Springer Publishing Company, LOCCCN 60-15818 

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In this paper I use the thesis that perspective shifting can fundamentally alter how we evaluate evidence as the backdrop for exploring the perennial challenge of bridging the divide between the subjective first-person perspective of experi-ence, and the objective third-person perspective of science. I begin by suggesting that reversible images pro...

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... remain agnostic regarding precisely how many additional dimensions may be required in order to provide the degrees of freedom necessary for time to flow and consciousness to have extensions in the present. Indeed, I am not even committed to the notion that such a realm must necessarily be thought of as possessing all of the mathematical formalities of spatial dimensions. My point is simply that the current material reductionist model of reality has left no room for time to flow or now to exist. It is as if physics has built a pen- dulum clock but left no space for the pendulum to swing. In statistics, there always must be one more degree of freedom than the total number of subjects and conditions so as to leave the freedom for variables to vary. I believe that such degrees of freedom are similarly required to enable experi- ence to flow through time. A dynamic depiction of the value of adding a second temporal dimension is illustrated in the fol- lowing three examples depicting a simple event of bottles breaking. The first (Figure 13; see video clip in its description) depicts the event as it would unfold from the first-person perspective, a dra-matic shattering of initially intact colored bottles. The second example (Figure 14) transforms this event into a block universe depiction in which ob- jective time is spatialized, and each slice corres- ponds to a separate moment of the event. Notice that in the block universe representation there is no motion (and hence no video clip), and no singu- lar frame (i.e., slice) corresponds to "now." How- ever, in the third example (Figure 15; see video clip in its description), an additional temporal di- mension is introduced so that the observer can move through the block universe. Frame by frame a moving "now" marches through the block uni- verse. By adding a second temporal dimension to the block universe, the dynamical experience of events unfolding is once again ...

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... Psychologist Jonathan Schooler proposes subjective time as a new dimension of physics that would allow us to have a causal effect on the world (Schooler, 2014). This model proposes that one could conceive of the possibility of alternative dimensions of meta-perspective where each of us could move across time and raises the possibility that consciousness itself could have some causal role. ...
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... Rubin's vase/two faces, a classic example of figure and ground[17]. ...
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