Figure 9 - uploaded by Jørn Knutsen
Content may be subject to copyright.
Rio's Operation Center is a 'smart city' joint venture between IBM and the city government. It is the first facility in the world that is on the path to integrating all of the functions of a city in a single digital command-and-control system. Photo: The City of Rio de Janeiro.

Rio's Operation Center is a 'smart city' joint venture between IBM and the city government. It is the first facility in the world that is on the path to integrating all of the functions of a city in a single digital command-and-control system. Photo: The City of Rio de Janeiro.

Source publication
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis investigates the relationship between networked cities, hybrid products and interaction design. The networked city describes an urban environment saturated with connected sensors, always-on mobile devices and tangles of computational and networked infrastructure that together produce torrential amounts of data. These circumstances are g...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... term has grown to represent a burgeoning industry that seeks to establish technological infrastructures to "improve economic and political efficiency and enable social, cultural and urban development" (Hollands, 2008:307), particularly through the use of information and communication technologies. The 'smart city' represents a plan for completely data- driven urban environments ruled by IT firms to monitor and efficiently manage the urban environment ( Figure 9). argues that the ideals, values and beliefs built into the concept of the 'smart city' have little to do with cities as we experience them, and that they promote "almost exclusively a discourse about the instrumentation of the urban fabric and the quantification of municipal processes, specifically for ease and efficiency of management" (ibid: Ch. 14, Para. ...

Citations

... Such devices are continuously enriched and upgraded through new technological offerings and features. However, their presence within larger communication networks and their continuous exchange and computation of data distort what Knutsen [26] calls the "spatial context" of static artifacts. Such IoT product hybrids can be seen as breaking the mold of traditional tools and interfaces. ...
... Such IoT product hybrids can be seen as breaking the mold of traditional tools and interfaces. Rather than being confined to certain domains and purposes, hybrid devices can be seen as "complex articulations and assemblages of material and cultural domain" [26]. ...
... Furthermore, digital technologies give a range of new challenges and possibilities for participation, social interaction and the creation of new urban public spheres (Hill 2012;Hemmersam et al. 2015). However, despite the growing proliferation of urban digital services, there is a lack of systematic knowledge on issues of urban transformation and development within the field of interaction and service design (Knutsen 2015;Martinussen 2015;Dourish & Bell 2011). Across these design fields, there is a growing need for indepth, applicable knowledge about the interrelations between urbanism, urban cultures, digital technology and the development of new digitally based urban services. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper identifies and discusses a set of challenges relating to the design of digital services in policies and strategies for more liveable and sustainable cities. These challenges emerge in the meeting between the knowledge and practice fields of digital design, which deal with service and interaction design, and urbanism, which is concerned with the study, planning and design of cities. The purpose of this paper is to lay the ground for a more inclusive and cross-disciplinary perspective on the conceptualisation, planning and realisation of the ‘urban digital’. This relates to how design and urban planning professionals learn to take seriously the societal responsibility implied in the development of digital services and products for everyday urban living
Thesis
Full-text available
Today, as the technical capabilities of 3D printers are advancing, they are finding newfound uses within product design as an Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology. Through a practice-led mode of design research, this thesis argues that AM needs to be supported by critical reflection of its technical capacities, as they are subjected to interpretation through contexts of use. It does so through investigating the relationship between design, making and critique, particularily in the context of design education. In the mode of a thesis by compilation, I develop a holistic model of design- making critique in which product design is oriented towards critical and future-oriented forms of inquiry. With making as a core and integrating activity, the model moves from design-making critique through emergent use groups, into a wider technological design frame. The model is positioned with respect to the diverse means, context, tools and memberships in which making is made manifest. The study makes the following overarching contributions. Firstly, it critiques the sociotechnical transformation of AM from within the product design field. Secondly, it incorporates theories of socio-technological development into design pedagogy. Thirdly, it realigns critical making approaches to design expertise. For design practitioners, the study may also be useful for generating insight into the technical materials of AM, in applying them in contextual design processes, and as a tool for technological reflection.