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Results of online consultation (part I) on institutional change (in %, 107-110 responses)

Results of online consultation (part I) on institutional change (in %, 107-110 responses)

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This report synthesizes the findings of a series of four online consultations which were conducted as part of the study “The Future of Learning: New Ways to Learn New Skills for Future Jobs”. The findings suggest that, while the existing physical and formal structures of education and training will remain intact, schools and universities will chang...

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... Due to continual (eg., technological) developments in society and the increasingly dynamic nature of (eg., international) markets (Redecker et al., 2010), higher education needs to deliver students who are agile enough to adapt to these changes (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, 2010). Lifelong learning is necessary, and educational institutions are expected to offer learning opportunities adapted to a variety of learners (Carlsen, Holmberg, Neghina, & Owusu-Boampong, 2016;UNESCO, 2009). ...
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This study offers insights into the processes that play a role in realizing curriculum flexibility. Curriculum flexibility is conceptualized in terms of adaptability and accessibility of the curriculum to students' needs and capabilities. To realize curriculum flexibility, the teacher education institution in this study designed a blended curriculum with face-to-face and online components. This flexible curriculum aimed at increasing student enrolment and allowing for variety in students' graduation portfolios. Through semi-structured interviews with 10 teacher educators, conditions that could foster or hinder the realization of flexibility were investigated. Results indicate that different contextual, teacher-, and student-related conditions were perceived to affect (further) curriculum flexibility. Furthermore, teacher educators identified several challenges related to these influential conditions, which were recognized as tensions. Based on a discussion of these findings, recommendations for research and practice are given.
... These drivers have been listed in several reports on future development (e.g. Davies, Fidler, & Gorbis, 2011;Redecker et al., 2010;Talwar & Hancock, 2010), highlighting possible challenges, risks and possibilities. Demographic and political changes, economic turbulence, changing norms and legislation, new scientific findings, new technologies and environmental challenges, such as climate change, lead to new knowledge and skills to be incorporated in work procedures; they also give birth to new jobs, or hybridize existing jobs . ...
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... Experts agreed that, in the future the current gap between formally acquired skills and competences and labour market needs will not disappear. However, they expect that both education and training institutions and the labour market will have reacted to the increasing discrepancies: the former by entering into a dialogue with industry and by adapting curricula and syllabi accordingly [2]. Recognising that Technology is a key driver of change, the curriculum of the Building Engineering Degree should be revised and adapted to address technological changes. ...
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Information and Communications Technology (ICT) has become a constant presence in our daily lives. This technology is accessible at any time and in any place: we are " hyper-connected ". As a consequence, our ways of communication and learning are changing. The challenge of training the citizens of the XXI century involves incorporating the use of ICT-based competences to the teaching-learning process. Therefore technology and collaborative creativity are two key drivers of change to the structures and requirements of the working environment. However ICT-based learning requires a different approach rather than just the addition of content. Networked learning, connectivity and interactivity, self-learning, and collaborative creativity should be the principles on which this learning should be based. Recognising that Technology is a key driver of change, the curriculum of the Building Engineering Degree should be revised and adapted to address technological changes. Since February 2014 the Spanish Construction Industry has been subject to EU Directive 2014/24/UE, is intended to modernize European Government procurement and to reduce costs in the 28 EU member states. This directive allows members states to encourage, specify and even require the use of Building Information Modelling (BIM) for construction projects financed by EU public funds from 2016. The QBIMInvest Project supported by the Universidad Europea de Madrid, has recently carried out a survey, which is the subject of this communication, on the implementation of Digital Competencies in the Building Engineering degree. This study also gathers the opinions of the Technology and Building Management department members, to evaluate the need to extend the scope of the existing subject competencies to include BIM skills as a significant tool in the curriculum.
... Changing roles, border-breaking innovations, and co-creation of new knowledge also imply that future learning needs and regional demands are no longer separate. Educational institutions have a critical role as providers of knowledge and innovation in the region (Redecker et al., 2010;Halonen, 2014). The challenge is to constantly equip teachers with up-to-date pedagogical know-how as teachers act as gatekeepers and facilitators in the joint innovation processes. ...
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... As noted, various future reports (e.g., Talwar & Hancock, 2010;Redecker et al., 2010;Davies, Fidler, & Gorbis, 2011) list various 'change drivers' that require co-ordinated, often global solutions, e.g., in the fields of environment, finance and security. The list includes various challenges, threats and possibilities, demographic changes, economic turbulence, politics that have become complicated due to the ever-growing demands for more services, norms and legislation, scientific and technology emphasis, crossroads of generations, redefinition of talent, education and training, global distribution of electronic media, transitions in societies, and limits of natural resources. ...
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... Nevertheless, Pedró (2011) states that the future of education with ICT support is to learn more (using technologies to be more efficient in introducing new methodological approaches), to learn better (using technologies to personalize learning), and to learn in a different way (using technologies to facilitate the acquisition of 21 st century skills). ICT will facilitate that formal institutions in 2020-2030 will be more flexible, transparent and open, and will promote practical and real-life learning opportunities, multicultural, collaborative, self-regulated and personalized learning (Redecker et al., 2010). Redecker et al. (2010) predict that formal education will still be based on schools while Miller et al. (2008) learning consider that learning is tending towards the abandonment of the technocratic, hierarchical and exclusive approach to education and skills achievement and the marginalization of institutionalized learning. ...
... ferent way (using technologies to facilitate the acquisition of 21 st century skills). ICT will facilitate that formal institutions in 2020-2030 will be more flexible, transparent and open, and will promote practical and real-life learning opportunities, multicultural, collaborative, self-regulated and personalized learning (Redecker et al., 2010). Redecker et al. (2010) predict that formal education will still be based on schools while Miller et al. (2008) learning consider that learning is tending towards the abandonment of the technocratic, hierarchical and exclusive approach to education and skills achievement and the marginalization of institutionalized learning. In this sense, the Committee of Inq ...
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