RepTrak™ Reputation Model (Reputation Institute, 2017) RepTrak is the standard measurement that was developed by Charles Fombrun who provided a measurement of the views of public on the reputation of world's best-known companies. This reputation model provides companies with a standardized framework for benchmarking their corporate reputations internationally and to enable identification of factors that drive reputations. The RepTrak™ model measures on four (4) important core areas which are trust, esteem, admire, and good feeling (Figure 1) from the stakeholders perceptions towards the company (Reputation Institute, 2017). The reputation is built on seven (7) dimensions or facets namely, products/services, innovation, workplace, governance, citizenship, leadership, and performance (Reputation Institute, 2017). 

RepTrak™ Reputation Model (Reputation Institute, 2017) RepTrak is the standard measurement that was developed by Charles Fombrun who provided a measurement of the views of public on the reputation of world's best-known companies. This reputation model provides companies with a standardized framework for benchmarking their corporate reputations internationally and to enable identification of factors that drive reputations. The RepTrak™ model measures on four (4) important core areas which are trust, esteem, admire, and good feeling (Figure 1) from the stakeholders perceptions towards the company (Reputation Institute, 2017). The reputation is built on seven (7) dimensions or facets namely, products/services, innovation, workplace, governance, citizenship, leadership, and performance (Reputation Institute, 2017). 

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Corporate reputation is an intangible asset that brings many benefits to organizations. Past empirical studies showed that specific facets of RepTrak™ model positively influenced the reputation. However, the relevance of applying the RepTrak™ model that focuses on the Tobacco, Gambling, Alcohol, and Pornography (TGAP) industry in developing economy...

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... to Fombrun (1996), corporate reputation is a perceptual representation of a company's past actions and future prospects that describe the firm's overall appeal to all of its key constituents when compared with other leading competitors. Later, Fombrun (2012) further highlighted the new definitions of corporate reputation which focused on the different stakeholder group, whereby corporate reputation is defined as a collective evaluation of a corporation's attractiveness to a specific group of stakeholders relative to a reference group of corporations with which a corporation competes for the resources. In addition, Barnett et al., (2006) defined corporate reputation as stakeholders' collective judgements of a company based on the evaluation of financial, social and environment attributed to the company over time. Gotsi and Wilson (2001) explained reputation as an overall evaluation of stakeholders over the corporation over time. In a nutshell, corporation's reputation has five (5) significant characteristics, namely: (1) it is based on perceptions; (2) it is the cumulative perception of all stakeholders; (3) it is comparative, (4) it can be positive or negative; and (5) it is stable and enduring (Walker, 2010). RepTrak is the standard measurement that was developed by Charles Fombrun who provided a measurement of the views of public on the reputation of world's best-known companies. This reputation model provides companies with a standardized framework for benchmarking their corporate reputations internationally and to enable identification of factors that drive reputations. The RepTrak™ model measures on four (4) important core areas which are trust, esteem, admire, and good feeling (Figure 1) from the stakeholders perceptions towards the company (Reputation Institute, 2017). The reputation is built on seven (7) dimensions or facets namely, products/services, innovation, workplace, governance, citizenship, leadership, and performance (Reputation Institute, ...

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The chapter analyzes the reputation management of big Russian enterprises presented in the markets of the European Union (EU) member states. Central to the analysis of Russian business practices is the experience of raw energy companies, as raw materials currently account for the largest share of Russian exports. The Russian oil and gas giants, due to their privileged position, do not ensure their reputation as carefully as non-commodity companies (the experience of the latter is studied on the example of Sberbank). For the last years, the intangible assets of many Russian companies have fallen significantly. We try to prove that not only the internal problems of Russian companies, their reputation management mistakes, but also the intensification of psychological warfare in the EU media space plays some role in that.