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Relationship Between Team Performance and Education Level, Organizational Tenure, or Team Tenure

Relationship Between Team Performance and Education Level, Organizational Tenure, or Team Tenure

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The authors revisited the demographic diversity variable and team performance relationship using meta-analysis and took a significant departure from previous meta-analyses by focusing on specific demographic variables (e.g., functional background, organizational tenure) rather than broad categories (e.g., highly job related, less job related). They...

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... sum, educational background variety diversity was unrelated to team performance, except when creativity or innovation was the criterion of interest or when the team was a TMT. Table 2 presents results for Hypotheses 7 through 13. We predicted a positive relationship between mean educational level and team performance (Hypothesis 7) that would be stron- ger than the relationship between educational level variety diversity and team performance (Hypothesis 8). ...

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... Bunderson and Sutcliffe, 2002), perspectives (e.g. Bell et al., 2011), and networks (e.g. Parker et al., 2019). ...
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... Functional diversity refers to the knowledge of professionals in different functional specializations such as engineering, marketing, human resource, finance, and research and development (Bell et al., 2011). Functional diversity is an essential source of expertise among executive members (Bunderson and Sutcliffe, 2002), which provides different functional expertise, knowledge, and information, stimulating group members to increase team creativity (Sung and Choi, 2019). ...
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... The member who has long tenure, he/she has a deeper understanding of organization culture, system and accessibility to resources. Hence, he/she can influence to organization dynamic using the socialization process (Bell et al.,2011). Most the directors have a long tenure at that time they develop their own way to do organization task more efficiently further it facilitates for risk aversion and group thinking Behaviour (Bantel and Jackson, 1989). ...
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... Meanwhile, the influence of meta-analysis has increased by highlighting the importance of job-related dimensions, which are positively related to team creativity and innovative performance (Bell et al., 2011;Van Dijk et al., 2012). Another meta-analysis has developed a contingency framework and empirically tested the significant difference between surface and deep-level diversity (Guillaume et al., 2012). ...
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