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Regeneration of vitamin E (tocopherol) by vitamin C.

Regeneration of vitamin E (tocopherol) by vitamin C.

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Vitamin C is a very important module related to many biochemical functions of human body. Vitamin C is highly sensitive and can be lost if exposed to high temperature, humid air, light, and alkaline pH. In recent decades, use of chitosan nanoparticles as nanocarriers has received much attention due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and n...

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... two different phases, lipid and aqueous phase, respectively, interaction occurs between them [19]. Because vitamin C is water soluble, it cannot enter the phospholipid bilayer and must interact with tocopheroxyl radical near the membrane surface. Tocopherol is regenerated by reducing tocopheroxyl radical with the help of glutathione and cysteine. Fig. 4 shows the schematic of vitamin E (tocopherol) regeneration mechanism by vitamin C. Ascorbic acid is much more active and efficient than cysteine and glutathione in reducing pheroxyl radical ...

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