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Recruitment of graduates of research institutes at the St. Petersburg Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences (2000-10) (in numbers)

Recruitment of graduates of research institutes at the St. Petersburg Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences (2000-10) (in numbers)

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The chapter presents the Russian institutional context of the academic career, analyses how the scientific space is structured in Russia. It studies the role played by international scientific mobility in the intellectual biography of Russian scholars and their academic careers. The findings of an empirical study of Russian scientists' internationa...

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... there are not enough vacancies for young people (Georgiev, 2009). According to the statistical data of the Department of Post-graduate Courses of the St. Petersburg Scientifi c Centre, only 63.2 % of PhD students recruited at research institutes from the St. Petersburg Scientifi c Centre in 2010, such that 36.8 % of students fi nishing post-graduate studies are forced to seek employment elsewhere ( Figure 3). Particular features of the Russian academic market, with its opaque rules of the game and the scientifi c community's general lack of consensus on signifi cant academic symbols (academic degree, discoveries, grants, ad- ministrative position, recognition abroad), hamper the strategic planning of professional biographies, which are 'modelled' on academic life and form a rather situational approach (Frantsouz, 2004: 44). ...

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