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Real-world input (hybrid street map, customer's pickup/delivery locations, and vehicle positions) and corresponding viable transportation network. Diamond symbols A, C, and D represent autonomous, conventional, and dual-mode vehicles, respectively.

Real-world input (hybrid street map, customer's pickup/delivery locations, and vehicle positions) and corresponding viable transportation network. Diamond symbols A, C, and D represent autonomous, conventional, and dual-mode vehicles, respectively.

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Conference Paper
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Autonomous vehicles (AVs) are expected to widely re-define mobility in the future, transforming many solutions into autonomous services. Nonetheless, this development requires an expected transition phase of several decades in which some regions will provide sufficient infrastructure for AV movements, while others will not support AVs yet. In this...

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