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Ratio of post-coppicing to pre-coppicing aboveground volume (recovered size) by harvest group for each species. The ratio of post-: pre-coppicing volume recovery did not vary among species at 9 (white) or 19 (gray) months after coppicing (Kruskal–Wallis; χ2 = 3.57, P = 0.468; χ2 = 4.30, P = 0.368, respectively). For the box plots, boxes indicate the inner quartile range, the solid line denotes the median, dots are outliers, and asterisks denote the mean. A single outlier for L. tulipifera for the 19-month harvest group is not shown (value = 3.37). Species are ordered (left to right) by their position along the savanna-to-wetland gradient (Schafer and Just 2014)

Ratio of post-coppicing to pre-coppicing aboveground volume (recovered size) by harvest group for each species. The ratio of post-: pre-coppicing volume recovery did not vary among species at 9 (white) or 19 (gray) months after coppicing (Kruskal–Wallis; χ2 = 3.57, P = 0.468; χ2 = 4.30, P = 0.368, respectively). For the box plots, boxes indicate the inner quartile range, the solid line denotes the median, dots are outliers, and asterisks denote the mean. A single outlier for L. tulipifera for the 19-month harvest group is not shown (value = 3.37). Species are ordered (left to right) by their position along the savanna-to-wetland gradient (Schafer and Just 2014)

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Key message: Along a fire frequency gradient, we found a savanna tree species had the greatest below ground decay compartmentalization after coppicing as compared to other resprouting species located at mesic gradient positions. Abstract: In pyrophilic ecosystems, woody plants are repeatedly injured or topkilled (i.e. aboveground tissue is killed...

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... It is therefore considered a key functional trait in many ecosystems worldwide (Clarke et al., 2013;Pausas and Keeley, 2014;Pausas et al., 2016Pausas et al., , 2018Ottaviani et al., 2017). In fire-prone environments, the capacity and strength of post-fire resprouting depends mainly on carbohydrates stored belowground and on dormant buds and meristems that are protected from the heat of fire by soil, bark, or other specialized structures (Knox and Clarke, 2005;Moreira et al. 2012;Clarke et al., 2013;Paula et al., 2016;Pausas et al., 2018), although other mechanisms may also be important (e.g., Just et al. 2017). ...
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