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| Ranking of the six merchandising elements. (i) The rank order based on actual sales data from Kühn et al. (2016). Rank order of the merchandising elements derived from fNIRS-derived sales prediction value of (A) Brodmann area 46 and (B) Brodmann area 9 as well as the (C) explicit subjective rating of the participants in the fNIRS study. The fNIRS-derived sales prediction values and percentages are displayed underneath the merchandising element. Matched rank order positions are marked in red. Figure partly adapted from Kühn et al. (2016). Permission to reuse has been obtained.

| Ranking of the six merchandising elements. (i) The rank order based on actual sales data from Kühn et al. (2016). Rank order of the merchandising elements derived from fNIRS-derived sales prediction value of (A) Brodmann area 46 and (B) Brodmann area 9 as well as the (C) explicit subjective rating of the participants in the fNIRS study. The fNIRS-derived sales prediction values and percentages are displayed underneath the merchandising element. Matched rank order positions are marked in red. Figure partly adapted from Kühn et al. (2016). Permission to reuse has been obtained.

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The (re-)launch of products is frequently accompanied by point-of-sale (PoS) marketing campaigns in order to foster sales. Predicting the success of these merchandising elements at the PoS on sales is of interest to research and practice, as the misinvestments that are based on the fragmented PoS literature are tremendous. Likewise, the predictive...

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Context 1
... finding was confirmed by the correlation analyses that revealed a positive significant Spearman rho correlation on the rank order data (r s = 0.943, n = 6, p = 0.005) and a positive significant Pearson correlation on the sales prediction values and actual sales (r p = 0.868, n = 6, p = 0.025) (Figure 6). For the qualitatively comparisons with the actual sales data ranking (Figure 7i), this rank order has all rank positions matched with the exception of the last 4th and 5th positions, which are reversed ( Figure 7A). ...
Context 2
... finding was confirmed by the correlation analyses that revealed a positive significant Spearman rho correlation on the rank order data (r s = 0.943, n = 6, p = 0.005) and a positive significant Pearson correlation on the sales prediction values and actual sales (r p = 0.868, n = 6, p = 0.025) (Figure 6). For the qualitatively comparisons with the actual sales data ranking (Figure 7i), this rank order has all rank positions matched with the exception of the last 4th and 5th positions, which are reversed ( Figure 7A). ...
Context 3
... the neural results reveal that the first rank position based on the calculated Brodmann area 9 fNIRS-derived sales prediction value of the merchandising contrast (Figure 7B) corresponds to the rank positions of the actual sales data. However, the associated correlations on rank order and sales prediction value with the actual sales data failed to reach significance threshold of p < 0.05 (r s = 0.771, n = 6, p = 0.072; r p = 0.648, n = 6, p = 0.164). ...
Context 4
... the associated correlations on rank order and sales prediction value with the actual sales data failed to reach significance threshold of p < 0.05 (r s = 0.771, n = 6, p = 0.072; r p = 0.648, n = 6, p = 0.164). For the explicit subjective ranking no matched rank positions could be identified qualitatively (Figure 7C), confirmed by small, non-significant correlations with the actual sales data (r s = −0.29, n = 6, p = 0.577; r p = 0.309, n = 6, p = 0.551). ...

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