Figure 4 - uploaded by Victoria Ramos
Content may be subject to copyright.
"Radio News" magazine, April 1924.

"Radio News" magazine, April 1924.

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
The first use of tests of communications technologies applied to medicine is almost as old as the invention of the telephone. Within a very short time, the telephone was shown as an essential element to ask or exchange information of medical content between health professionals. The spectacular development of broadcasting in the first quarter of th...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
The combination of cloud computing and telemedicine introduces new opportunities for transforming healthcare delivery in a more effective and sustainable manner. A number of telemedicine applications have been investigated and developed on the cloud, such as telemonitoring and teleconsultation, all of which fully demonstrate the potential of teleme...

Citations

... There is a long history of pioneers in telecardiology, the rst experiences of telecardiology were carried out in 1903 sending electrocardiograph from a hospital to a laboratory. [62,93,94] Historically, providers and hospital organizations have undertaken telecardiology to improve health outcomes, improve patient experience, reduce costs (e.g., through decreased re-hospitalizations for heart failure), and increase revenues from participation in federal pay-for-quality programs (introduced in the early 2000s in the US). [95] Technological improvements have also boosted interest in the use of telemedicine in cardiology. ...
... Clinical trials have shown these devices to bene t patients by helping detect arrhythmias more quickly, thereby reducing hospitalizations for arrhythmias and strokes, and eliminating the need for some clinic visits. [17,62,94] Psychiatry is credited with playing a pioneering role in the eld of telemedicine. Telepsychiatry has its origins in the 1950s, and The University of Nebraska's Nebraska Psychiatric Institute hosted the rst video-based psychiatric consults in 1959. ...
... Telepsychiatry has its origins in the 1950s, and The University of Nebraska's Nebraska Psychiatric Institute hosted the rst video-based psychiatric consults in 1959. [73,94] Although it began to be used as a tool for providing mental healthcare in remote areas, early pioneers in the eld began using it for improving the patient experience. Presently, it is considered a mainstream practice, integral to maximizing patient-centered care outcomes and patient and provider satisfaction. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Recent studies in the US have found wide variation in telehealth use across medical specialties (e.g., 6.1% in Allergy-Immunology vs. 24.1% in Cardiology). This is a problem-of-interest, because the US lacks a standardized set of telehealth reimbursement policies, which in turn has hindered telehealth use across all specialties. Despite these policy-level constraints experienced by all specialties, some have normalized telehealth use to mainstream practice, while others are just getting started during the pandemic. Despite accelerated telehealth use during COVID-19 through removal of federal coverage restrictions, uncertainties remain regarding future sustainability. This paper conducts a systematic review to identify “specialty-level factors” historically influencing telehealth use, with a view to identifying implications for widespread sustainability in the post-pandemic era. Methods: We conducted a systematic review and narrative synthesis to examine factors historically influencing telehealth use across six medical specialties in the US, including three “lower-using” specialties (Allergy-Immunology, Gastroenterology, Family Medicine) and three “higher-using” specialties (Cardiology, Psychiatry, Radiology). The “macro-meso-micro” framework was used to guide the review. Article searches were conducted on PubMed. The PRISMA checklist was used to guide reporting of literature reviewed. Three reviewers worked to develop a preliminary synthesis, identify eligibility criteria, explore themes in the data, and assess robustness of final synthesis. Results: Fifty-three articles were reviewed across six medical specialties. The review identified 12 factors across 3 layers, including: 1) macro-layer (policy-level, legal, other-structural), 2) meso-layer (specialty-level historical telehealth rationale, hospital-organizational, specialty-society, treatment, technological, research, cultural) and 3) micro-layer (individual-level provider-and-patient-specific) factors. A key finding was that among “higher-using” medical specialties, the specialty societies and hospital organizations in the meso-layer, proactively promoted telehealth use by influencing both macro- and micro-layer factors (e.g., advocating for consistent payment policies and enabling provider practices to be more tech-savvy & patient-centric, respectively). Conclusion: By identifying a comprehensive set of contextual, individual (and interaction) factors influencing telehealth use across six medical specialties, this review addresses a gap and provides a foundation for future research. Importantly, it identifies: 1) strategies for reducing variation in telehealth use across medical specialties, and 2) implications for ensuring widespread sustainability in the post-pandemic era.
... The industrial countries have had a significant amount of experience with the use of telemedicine during the last 50 years. In 1959, Nebraska Psychiatric Institute was one of the first health organizations that implemented telemedicine in the United States (Ramos, 2010;Jung et al., 2012). It utilized a television link to connect with Norfolk Hospital, which was 12 miles away. ...
... It utilized a television link to connect with Norfolk Hospital, which was 12 miles away. Such a link allowed physicians to communicate with both physicians and patients on the other end (Ramos, 2010). ...
... With such a link, Massachusetts General Hospital was able to provide instant healthcare services to employees and passengers at the airport. The services provided at the Logan Airport included cardiology, dermatology and radiology services (Ramos, 2010;Adler, 2000). Since then, telemedicine has achieved significant progress in the developed world. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
As technological advance leaps into the developing world, telemedicine is expected to significantly grow in many developing countries. It is important to investigate the awareness, preferences, requirements, perceptions and attitudes of physicians in Saudi Arabia towards the use of telemedicine technology. In order to promote the use of telemedicine among physicians, training should be focused on older professionals and those who show lower levels of IT knowledge and experience. This chapter uses the results of a survey that was conducted in the city of Al-Dammam, Saudi Arabia, which gathered information about physicians' awareness and attitude towards telemedicine. Most physicians reported high level of awareness of telemedicine and showed interest in using telemedicine technology in their work. Physicians' preference of using such technology was predicted by their awareness, knowledge and previous experience, using telemedicine and technology affinity. Physicians' willingness to use telemedicine was influenced by age, technology preparedness and practice.
... The industrial countries have had a significant amount of experience with the use of telemedicine during the last 50 years. In 1959, Nebraska Psychiatric Institute was one of the first health organizations that implemented telemedicine in the United States (Ramos, 2010;Jung et al., 2012). It utilized a television link to connect with Norfolk Hospital, which was 12 miles away. ...
... It utilized a television link to connect with Norfolk Hospital, which was 12 miles away. Such a link allowed physicians to communicate with both physicians and patients on the other end (Ramos, 2010). ...
... With such a link, Massachusetts General Hospital was able to provide instant healthcare services to employees and passengers at the airport. The services provided at the Logan Airport included cardiology, dermatology and radiology services (Ramos, 2010;Adler, 2000). Since then, telemedicine has achieved significant progress in the developed world. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
As technological advance leaps into the developing world, telemedicine is expected to significantly grow in many developing countries. It is important to investigate the awareness, preferences, requirements, perceptions and attitudes of physicians in Saudi Arabia towards the use of telemedicine technology. In order to promote the use of telemedicine among physicians, training should be focused on older professionals and those who show lower levels of IT knowledge and experience. This chapter uses the results of a survey that was conducted in the city of Al-Dammam, Saudi Arabia, which gathered information about physicians' awareness and attitude towards telemedicine. Most physicians reported high level of awareness of telemedicine and showed interest in using telemedicine technology in their work. Physicians' preference of using such technology was predicted by their awareness, knowledge and previous experience, using telemedicine and technology affinity. Physicians' willingness to use telemedicine was influenced by age, technology preparedness and practice.
Chapter
This chapter discusses how the management of care changes when care is separated. Changes to accommodate separated care impact the way appointments, examinations, procedures, administration and record keeping are managed. In professional contexts, practitioners are confronted with sometimes conflicting and sometimes complementary norms, processes and practices which taken together, function as sociotechnical codes. Conflicts can arise when choices have to be made between providing patient-centred care at home or reliance on established practices and patient pathways. Competition arises between information technologists, management and clinicians, collectively and individually, for control of the technology used by telehealth services. Disputes over healthcare and technology, based in competing sociotechnical codes, and the splitting of care between two or more places, require the active involvement of human actors to reconnect separated care.
Article
Background: Virtual medicine has been rapidly evolving over the past several decades. However, obstacles such as data security, inadequate funding and limited technological resources have hindered its seamless incorporation into the health care system. The recent pandemic has induced a widespread adoption of virtual care practices to remove the need for physical meetings between patients and health care practitioners. Purpose: This literature review aims to examine the current state of virtual medicine amid the COVID-19 pandemic and evaluate the benefits, limitations and implications of continuing technological advancements in the future. Findings: Most of the available literature suggests that the recent adoption of virtual medicine has allowed practitioners to cut down on costs and secondary expenses while maintaining the quality of medical care services. Due to the growing consumer demand, researchers predict that virtual medicine may be a viable modality for patient care post-pandemic. However, concerns surrounding patient security and digital infrastructure threaten the ability of virtual medicine to provide quality and effective health care. Additionally, rural virtual medicine programs face challenges in expanding services due to the scarcity of information and communication technology specialists and inadequate funding. Comprehensive legislation and governance standards must be implemented to ensure proper data security and privacy. Additional funds may also be required to train staff, reform current digital software and improve the quality of service. The proliferation of advanced technologies and improvements in current platforms will enable more providers to render virtual medical care services.
Preprint
Full-text available
Using a case study of the RAFT network, I described the need for digital health solutions in Africa for patient care and Continuing Medical Education for clinicians and the role of health informaticians like me in such projects. Together with the Pan African e-Network Project, such projects have the potential of revolutionizing health care in Africa