Table 8 - uploaded by Jeany Slijper
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Quotes that are illustrative for different attitudes. 

Quotes that are illustrative for different attitudes. 

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The present study examined the relation between study progress in the first year of education and different aspects of the process of study choice of 89 students of higher professional education. This study consists of three parts. Firstly, we explored which concepts are important in open interviews concerning choice of study and study progress. Se...

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... two types of ambivalence: students who doubted whether they made the right choice 22 and students who doubted whether they could successfully finish their studies. Table 8 shows these quotes. Doubting Dropout 12. 'I'm dreading it, I don't have any legal background, and I followed a secondary vocational education. ...

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... The first explanation is that among the undergraduate academic indicators we examined, there were none that measured motivation of students. There are, however, some indications that intrinsic motivation exerts positive influence on study progress (Slijper et al., 2016). We could not use assessments of motivation due to a practical reason (they were not available in our institutional data). ...
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... Pintrich et al. (1991) described a model in which academic motivation is addressed from a three-dimensional approach that includes the components of expectation -students' beliefs about their own abilities to perform an academic task-, of value -students' goals of the and beliefs about the importance and interest for academic tasks-, and of affection -students' emotional reactions to academic tasks-. (Andre et al., 2018;Ilustrisimo, 2016;Pavliuk et al., 2018;Peetsma et al., 2017;Slijper et al., 2016). A primacy of future time has been predominantly associated with the fulfillment of long-term goals and plans, increased motivation, persevering and disciplined behavior of subjects (Boyd & Zimbardo, 2005), greater cognitive control (Steindam, 2016) and successful coping mechanisms (Bolotova & Hachaturova, 2013), which in sum has a positive effect on academic performance and consequently on degree completion (Bukharina & Tolstykh, 2019;Janeiro et al., 2017;Phan, 2009;Steel et al., 2018). ...
... Statistically significant relationships among the examined variables were found. On one side, PP time perspective, academic achievement, and academic motivation were positively correlated, which was expected considering the existent literature (Andre et al., 2018;Barnett et al., 2020;Ilustrisimo, 2016;Kim et al., 2017;Kooji et al., 2018;Nausheen, 2016;Pavliuk et al., 2018;Peetsma et al., 2017;Slijper et al., 2016) and the theoretical implications that recollecting one's past positive memories, especially if they are based on academic experiences or events, could have on being academic motivated to accomplish academic goals. On the other side, procrastination was negatively associated with academic achievement, but it did not associate in a statistically significant way with PP time perspective and academic motivation (yet it was still a negative relationship). ...
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... These intentions are defined as the "level and type of education and occupation desired by the individual" (1993, p. 115), as well as the students' commitment to these objectives of educational attainment (goal commitment) and to the new school (institutional commitment). Educational and career aspirations (Hegna, 2014;Slijper et al., 2016), as well as those specifically related to the institution (Catterall et al., 2014) have been empirically related to dropout. ...
... While socioeconomic differences in summer "learning loss" and dropout risk of students are recognized , initiatives aimed at smoothing this transition tend to be school-wide and concentrate on organizational and administrative procedures, as well as on academics, rather than on children's social concerns Jindal-Snape & Miller, 2008;Topping, 2011). Likewise, research on interventions aimed at improving educational transitions (Berlin et al., 2011;Slijper et al., 2016) is scarce and rarely focuses on the transition from primary to secondary education van Rens et al., 2018), nor on dropout prevention. The quantitative effects of summer interventions on students' academic achievement are often the main concern Gorard et al., 2017). ...
Thesis
To access tertiary studies, to “land” a better job, to not have to go through what their parents went through, or just “to be someone in life” —students from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods are quick to provide a myriad of reasons why they ought to complete secondary education. In most societies nowadays all children, disadvantaged or not, are expected to start attending school at a specific age and to complete a certain amount of years of schooling. Yet there are many whom, for one reason or another, quit school at some point, before completing the necessary requisites to obtain a diploma. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as school dropout. Leaving school before completing secondary education puts these individuals at a disadvantage when they try to get a job or to continue their studies. Compared to secondary school graduates, those who drop out tend to perceive a lower income, have poorer health and well-being. High dropout rates have also been associated with multiple negative consequences and high costs for the society as a whole, such as increased delinquency, loss of tax revenues and more dependence on social welfare. Causes and consequences of school dropout have been extensively studied. Several theories and conceptual models exist that help to understand the process by which this outcome materializes. Yet dropout rates continue to be of concern. In 2015, the United Nations member countries agreed to achieve universal secondary school completion by 2030. This has increased the international pressure to reduce dropout rates, especially in parts of the world where massification of secondary education access and completion is rather recent and educational systems’ efficiency is not at its best, as is the case in Latin America. Uruguay is one of many Latin American countries which could benefit from narrowing the gap in secondary school completion between individuals from higher and lower socio-economic backgrounds. Having accomplished universal primary school graduation since a long time, the current challenges for Uruguay lie in smoothing the transition from primary to lower secondary school, as well as in fostering students’ successful academic and social integration in the first year of secondary education. To achieve this, the current knowledge base on secondary school dropout ought to be enriched by empirical research on the ways lower secondary schools can positively impact the trajectory through the first year of secondary school of students whose prior schooling, individual and family characteristics put them at higher risk of dropout. Understanding the specific circumstances under which disadvantaged, “high-risk” population live and attend school is key for designing, targeting, implementing and evaluating successful dropout prevention strategies. The overall objective of this research is, therefore, to contribute to the scientific knowledge on the secondary school dropout phenomenon. We aim to add to the empirical base of this field of research by combining statistical analyses and case studies in a mixed methods approach. We intend to contribute to the theoretical base of dropout research by applying and adapting Vincent Tinto’s “longitudinal model of student departure” to the Uruguayan lower secondary school setting, by assessing how well students pre-entry characteristics predict dropout, by analyzing the influence of preventive interventions in the summer transition period, as well as by exploring the particular role context variables—such as the socioeconomic composition of the school and community violence exposure—play in students’ academic success and dropout decisions. By providing insights on these aspects of the dropout phenomenon and intervention possibilities, we intend to support school staff, teachers and principals working in low-SES, high-violence settings in their dropout prevention efforts. We also wish to provide some recommendations and implications, based on our findings, for policymakers working in the fields of education and social development.
... En vista de nuestros hallazgos, la perspectiva temporal de futuro también es relevante para explicar la probabilidad de persistencia de los estudiantes. Las investigaciones previas se han centrado en su efecto en el proceso de aprendizaje (Janeiro, et al., 2017;Slijper, Kunnen, Onstenk, & van Geert, 2016). En concreto, la perspectiva temporal de futuro se ha relacionado con la motivación y las estrategias de aprendizaje. ...
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El objetivo de este trabajo fue analizar el papel de los enfoques de aprendizaje y la perspectiva temporal de futuro en la persistencia académica de estudiantes universitarios de primer año. La muestra estuvo compuesta por 453 estudiantes de grado de primer año de la Universidad de Sevilla (España). Para medir la probabilidad de persistencia de los estudiantes, se emplearon los tres predictores significativos de la traducción al español del Cuestionario de Persistencia Universitaria (College Persistence Questionnaire, CPQ). Además, se utilizaron el cuestionario revisado de procesos de estudio de dos factores (Revised Two Factor Study Process Questionnaire, RSPQ-2F) y el inventario de perspectiva temporal (Time Perspective Inventory) para medir, respectivamente, los enfoques de aprendizaje y la perspectiva temporal de futuro. Un análisis de clúster jerárquico permitió la identificación de dos grupos de estudiantes con alta y baja probabilidad de persistencia. Se llevó a cabo un análisis de regresión logística por pasos para evaluar la contribución de los enfoques de aprendizaje y la perspectiva temporal de futuro a la explicación de la probabilidad de persistencia de los estudiantes. Nuestros resultados mostraron que ambos constructos son predictores significativos de la persistencia de los estudiantes universitarios. Los estudiantes con enfoque profundo y con una visión positiva de su futuro tienen mayor probabilidad de persistir en sus estudios que aquellos estudiantes con enfoque superficial de aprendizaje y una perspectiva de futuro negativa. Teniendo en cuenta que se ha demostrado que es posible provocar cambios en los enfoques de aprendizaje de los estudiantes, nuestros hallazgos ponen de manifiesto la relevancia de utilizar metodologías de enseñanza que faciliten la utilización del enfoque profundo de aprendizaje para prevenir el abandono de los estudiantes.
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