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Proposed checklist for designers to work with scalable green infrastructure (GI) in low density housing.

Proposed checklist for designers to work with scalable green infrastructure (GI) in low density housing.

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The planning, implementation, and everyday use of the built environment interweave the green and grey components of urban fabric tightly together. Runoff from grey and impermeable surfaces causes stormwater that is managed in permeable surfaces that simultaneously act as habitats for vegetation. Green infrastructure (GI) is one of the concepts that...

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... this potential for biodiversity is proposed to especially rely on residential areas [39,51]. Figure 7 sums up our proposal for a designer's checklist to work with scalable GI that starts on plot scale designs. Based on this study, there appears to be room for development in the design practices if the aim is to improve the GI of LDH. ...

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Tiivistyvä kaupunkirakenne lisää läpäisemättömien pintojen määrää, mikä puolestaan johtaa hulevesien määrän kasvuun. Tämä asettaa haasteita tilankäytölle ilmastonmuutokseen varautuvissa kaupungeissa. Enää ei ole varaa yhden käyttötarkoituksen tilaratkaisuihin, vaan kaikkien ratkaisujen on oltava monitoiminnallisia, myös hulevesien hallintapaikkojen. Tämän työn perustana on ajatus ihmisen ja luonnon vuorovaikutteisesta, ns. ekososiaalisesta systeemistä, joka läpäisee koko kaupunkirakenteen. Tämä työ tilattiin osaksi Paraisten kaupungin yleiskaavan päivitystä. Se keskittyy asemakaava-alueen tasoon, vaikka luotaa kaupunginosa- ja tonttitasojakin. Tutkimus lähtee liikkeelle Ian McHargin kehittelemästä karttapohjaisesta maiseman piirteiden analyysistä. Jotta tarkastelu saisi enemmän ekososiaalista ulottuvuutta, kerrostetaan vihreän infrastruktuurin tarjoamia näkökulmia edellisten ylle. Sitä kautta veden kiertokulun yhteyksistä niin ekologiseen, sosiaaliseen kuin taloudelliseenkin kytkeytyneisyyteen tulee keskeisiä tälle työlle. Lisäksi kaupunkikuvan kytkeytyneisyyttä tarkastellaan Kevin Lynchin ympäristöpsykologisesta näkökulmasta. Yhdistettyjen tulosten pohjalta hahmottuu kokonaiskuva hulevesien hallinnan verkostosta, missä kytkeytyneisyydet tukevat kaupungin muutosjoustavuutta. Hulevesien hajautetut hallintapaikat tyypitellään sen mukaan, mitä kytkeytyneisyyden lajeja kussakin pystytään parhaiten tukemaan. Ne voidaan nähdä rajapintoina, joilla eri virtaukset kohtaavat. Lopuksi tarjotaan esimerkkejä niistä tavoista, joilla hallintaa tulisi suunnitella ja toteuttaa näissä kohteissa. > > > > > The densification of the city structure increases the amount of impervious surfaces, which, in turn, increases the amount of stormwater runoff. This poses challenges to the use of space in the cities preparing for the climate change. We cannot afford single-use spaces anymore, but each has to be multifunctional, including the places for runoff management. This bachelor’s thesis is based on the idea of an interdependent, so-called social-ecological system between humans and nature that runs through the whole city structure. This work was commissioned as a part of the update of the general land use plan of the city of Parainen. It focuses on the scale of the detailed plan area even if the neighbourhood and plot scales are probed as well. The research starts off with a map-based analysis of landscape characters developed by Ian McHarg. In order for the approach to gain in social-ecological dimension, points of view provided by the green infrastructure are layered upon the previous ones. Thereby, the linkages be-tween hydrology and ecological, social, and economic connectivities become central to this work. Additionally, the connectivity of the city’s image is explored from the point of view of Lynch’s environmental psychology. An overall picture of a network of stormwater management emerges from the combined results. In it, the connectivities lend support to the resilience of the city. The distributed places of runoff management are typified according to the kinds of connectivities that they can best support. They can be seen as interfaces where different flows connect. Finally, some examples of the methods with which the runoff management ought to be planned and executed in these places are given.