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Procedure under the new Act: from notification to decision. Schulinck / Wolters Kluwer Nederland B.V. Source: Wet maatschappelijke ondersteuning 2015 (2014).

Procedure under the new Act: from notification to decision. Schulinck / Wolters Kluwer Nederland B.V. Source: Wet maatschappelijke ondersteuning 2015 (2014).

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Article
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This research examines the legal capabilities of social care practitioners involved in a new decision-making process, ‘the kitchen table conversation’, used since the introduction of the 2015 Social Support Act in the Netherlands. This law delegates social care allocation to the local authorities, who employ social care practitioners to assess and...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... researcher (DC) attended personally all three kitchen table conversations as a participant observer. Elements from the general procedure under the new Act (see Figure 1) and indicators from the public legal education evaluation framework (Collard et al., 2011) served as an Kitchen table conversations were audio recorded and observation notes were taken in all cases. These recordings were made with the permission of both the social care professional and the applicant to a personalised solution, and with a signed a confidentiality statement from the researcher (DC). ...
Context 2
... the interviews, respondents were asked about their own practices during the kitchen table conversation, in order to find out about their attitudes and skills concerning the legal aspects of the new Act. At the end of the interview, the procedure under the new Act was presented in order to test their knowledge (see Figure 1). Tables 2 and 3 give an overview of the respondents of individual and group interviews involved in this case study. ...
Context 3
... recordings were as well coded using the same framework. Additionally, the specific knowledge of the procedure under the new Act was tested based on the infographic displayed hereunder (Figure 1). The related set of questions was included in the interview guide used for the individual interviews. ...
Context 4
... a care provider's perspective, she would rather have informed the client immediately. (Kitchen table conversation, November 2016) In the policy that arose in partnership with the council, this form of consultation with the team aims to create the opportunity to share knowledge and experience at case level and learn from one another. This would facilitate the establishment of a standardised assessment framework. ...
Context 5
... researcher (DC) attended personally all three kitchen table conversations as a participant observer. Elements from the general procedure under the new Act (see Figure 1) and indicators from the public legal education evaluation framework (Collard et al., 2011) served as an Kitchen table conversations were audio recorded and observation notes were taken in all cases. These recordings were made with the permission of both the social care professional and the applicant to a personalised solution, and with a signed a confidentiality statement from the researcher (DC). ...
Context 6
... the interviews, respondents were asked about their own practices during the kitchen table conversation, in order to find out about their attitudes and skills concerning the legal aspects of the new Act. At the end of the interview, the procedure under the new Act was presented in order to test their knowledge (see Figure 1). Tables 2 and 3 give an overview of the respondents of individual and group interviews involved in this case study. ...
Context 7
... recordings were as well coded using the same framework. Additionally, the specific knowledge of the procedure under the new Act was tested based on the infographic displayed hereunder (Figure 1). The related set of questions was included in the interview guide used for the individual interviews. ...
Context 8
... a care provider's perspective, she would rather have informed the client immediately. (Kitchen table conversation, November 2016) In the policy that arose in partnership with the council, this form of consultation with the team aims to create the opportunity to share knowledge and experience at case level and learn from one another. This would facilitate the establishment of a standardised assessment framework. ...

Citations

... Similar to social services in other European countries, the social care landscape in the Netherlands has changed drastically over the last few years (Martinelli et al. 2017;O'Cinneide 2014;Claessen et al. 2019). Following a series of decentralizations and austerity measures, social workers in the Netherlands may now find themselves on the one hand trying to realize the best possible care for their clients while on the other hand dealing with new laws and policy expectations focused on self-reliance and diminished access to specialist care. ...
... In addition to differences in knowledge about care requirements, social workers may also differ in their knowledge of law and policy (Claessen et al. 2019). It is clear from the way in which social workers describe how they deal with the limited access to specialist care that it is important to have a sound knowledge of law and policy in order to be able to arrange access to specialist care for clients. ...
Article
Full-text available
The realization of human rights standards depends in part on the commitment of local actors. It can be argued that local public service professionals such as social workers can also be regarded as key players. The possible role of social workers becomes imperative if these professionals are working in a policy context that is not congruent with human rights. If existing laws or policies cause or maintain disrespect for human rights, social workers are in a position to observe that this is having an adverse impact on clients. When social workers are regarded as human rights actors, the question arises how they can or should respond to law and policy that impedes them in carrying out their work with respect for human rights. This article adds to existing theories on social workers as human rights actors by examining the practices of social professionals working in such a challenging policy context. The research took place among professionals in social district teams in the city of Utrecht, the Netherlands. Following a series of decentralizations and austerity measures the social care landscape in the Netherlands has changed drastically over the last few years. As a result, social workers may find themselves on the one hand trying to realize the best possible care for their clients while on the other hand dealing with new laws and policy expectations focused on self-reliance and diminished access to specialist care. The article explores how social professionals’ responses to barriers in access to care affect human rights requirements. In doing so, this socio-legal study provides insight into the ways in which everyday social work relates to the realization of human rights at the local level.