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Probabilistic space constructed by an uninvolved participant P to predict the outcomes of the experiments. A team of interacting experimenters O and O' is described from the standpoint of an uninvolved participant who knows the initial experimental conditions (Fig. 2). We suppose a probability equal to p for the event " direct relationship " and equal to q for the event " reverse relationship " (p + q = 1). Each observer has his own probabilistic expectations and P assigns the probability p to O as the best estimate that O can make for the future observation of a direct relationship; the same probability is assigned to O' independently of O since the probabilistic expectations are specific to each observer. White areas are unauthorized experimental situations with incompatible outcomes after interaction of O and O' (e.g. " direct " for O and " reverse " for O'). Therefore, the probability that the experimenters observe a direct relationship is calculated by dividing the central gray area ( " direct " for both observers) by the sum of the probabilities of possible outcomes (either " direct " or " reverse " for both observers), namely all gray areas. Ω, probability space 

Probabilistic space constructed by an uninvolved participant P to predict the outcomes of the experiments. A team of interacting experimenters O and O' is described from the standpoint of an uninvolved participant who knows the initial experimental conditions (Fig. 2). We suppose a probability equal to p for the event " direct relationship " and equal to q for the event " reverse relationship " (p + q = 1). Each observer has his own probabilistic expectations and P assigns the probability p to O as the best estimate that O can make for the future observation of a direct relationship; the same probability is assigned to O' independently of O since the probabilistic expectations are specific to each observer. White areas are unauthorized experimental situations with incompatible outcomes after interaction of O and O' (e.g. " direct " for O and " reverse " for O'). Therefore, the probability that the experimenters observe a direct relationship is calculated by dividing the central gray area ( " direct " for both observers) by the sum of the probabilities of possible outcomes (either " direct " or " reverse " for both observers), namely all gray areas. Ω, probability space 

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... It is worth noting that the placebo effect is considered more relevant in non-pharmacological treatments [20,21] including complementary alternative medicines (CAMs) [20,22]. It depends on several conditions, including the significant role of interpersonal touch [9], the multiplicity of treatment sessions [23], and the optimisation of the patient-physician relationship . ...
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