Prevalence rate of stress among HCW during COVID-19.

Prevalence rate of stress among HCW during COVID-19.

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Background As India is fighting against the second wave of COVID-19, Healthcare professionals are the front-line warriors on that battlefield which puts them under psychological pressure, this systematic review aims to critically look into and amalgamate the evidence on impact of COVID-19 on psychological health of healthcare professionals in India...

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... 5796 participants in 5 studies was 41.90% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 29.17 to 54.64) (Fig. 3), Prevalence of anxiety in 10 studies with sample size of 3059 was 42.87% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 30.26 to 55.49) (Fig. 4), Prevalence of stress in 12 studies with 4209 participants recorded a prevalence rate of 58.04 (95% CI: 44.81-71.28) (Fig. 5), Prevalence of worry in 3 studies with 276 participants demonstrated a prevalence rate of 66.54 (95% CI: 46.54-86.53) (Fig. 6), Prevalence of sleeping problem in 3 studies with 416 participants recorded a prevalence rate of 31.94 (95% CI: 21.38-42.49) (Fig. 7), Prevalence of fear in 3 studies with 244 participants recorded a prevalence ...

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... The impact of this pandemic on the physical and mental health of healthcare professionals has been highlighted in several reports since the initial outbreak. A plethora of studies examined the prevalence of mental health symptoms in healthcare professionals facing the pandemic on the front line, reporting moderate and high levels of stress, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbance, and burnout [79][80][81]. In the aftermath of the COVID-19 outbreak, healthcare professionals had to work under extreme pressure and needed to balance conflicting demands related to their own physical and mental health as well as those of colleagues, patients, and family members [54]. ...
... Patient-centered interviewing, caring communication skills, and shared decision making are strategies known to improve patient-professional communication [86]. Given the serious nature of the COVID-19 outbreak, it is not surprising that a high proportion of patients experienced depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic symptoms [81,87]. Therefore, early detection and appropriate treatment of mental health symptoms are required in patients with COVID-19, both during and after acute symptom resolution, in order to reintegrate with society and family life [88]. ...
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Citation: Aparicio Betancourt, M.; Duarte-Díaz, A.; Vall-Roqué, H.; Seils, L.; Orrego, C.; Perestelo-Pérez, L.; Barrio-Cortes, J.; Beca-Martínez, M.T.; Molina Serrano, A.; Bermejo-Caja, C.J.; et al. Global Healthcare Needs Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed gaps and areas of need in health systems worldwide. This work aims to map the evidence on COVID-19-related healthcare needs of adult patients, their family members, and the professionals involved in their care during the first year of the pandemic. We searched the databases MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science. Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts and assessed full texts for eligibility. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Descriptive data were extracted and inductive qualitative content analysis was used to generate codes and derive overarching themes. Thirty-six studies met inclusion criteria, with the majority reporting needs from the perspective of professionals (35/36). Professionals' needs were grouped into three main clusters (basic, occupational, and psycho-socio-emotional needs); patients' needs into four (basic, healthcare, psycho-socio-emotional, and other support needs); and family members' needs into two (psycho-socio-emotional and communication needs). Transversal needs across subgroups were also identified and grouped into three main clusters (public safety, information and communication, and coordination and support needs). This evidence map provides valuable insight on COVID-19-related healthcare needs. More research is needed to assess first-person perspectives of patients and their families, examine whether needs differ by country or region, and evaluate how needs have evolved over time.
... Similarly, a cut-off score of >7 and >14 denote positive screen anxiety and stress, respectively. The anxiety subscale score is assessed as "mild" (8-9), "moderate" (10)(11)(12)(13)(14), "severe" (15)(16)(17)(18)(19), and extremely severe" (20-42), whereas the stress subscale score is divided into "mild" (15)(16)(17)(18), "moderate" (19)(20)(21)(22)(23)(24)(25), "severe" (26-33), and "extremely severe" stress (34-42). ...
... A 5-point Likert scale is used to rate each item (e.g., 0 = no problem; 4 = very severe problem), yielding a total score ranging from 0 to 28. The total score is then interpreted as follows: absence of insomnia (0-7), subthreshold insomnia (8)(9)(10)(11)(12)(13)(14), moderate insomnia (15)(16)(17)(18)(19)(20)(21), and severe insomnia (22-28). ...