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Prevalence of lifetime and 6 months pre-prison drug use by type of drug and gender (n = 1499)

Prevalence of lifetime and 6 months pre-prison drug use by type of drug and gender (n = 1499)

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Background: Remarkably little is known about drug use during imprisonment, including whether it represents a continuation of pre-incarceration drug use, or whether prison is also a setting for drug use initiation. This paper aims to describe drug use among people in prison in Norway and investigate risk factors associated with in-prison drug use....

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Context 1
... the 1499 respondents, 973 (65.2%) reported lifetime use of drugs. The different types of drugs used are shown in Table 2. Poly-drug use was commonly reported, often involving several substances. ...
Context 2
... was the most commonly used drug (45%), followed by amphetamines (33%), benzodiazepines (33%), and cocaine (25%). Heroin was used by 11% (n = 168) ( Table 2). ...
Context 3
... the 1499 respondents, 973 (65.2%) reported lifetime use of drugs. The different types of drugs used are shown in Table 2. Poly-drug use was commonly reported, often involving several substances. ...
Context 4
... was the most commonly used drug (45%), followed by amphetamines (33%), benzodiazepines (33%), and cocaine (25%). Heroin was used by 11% (n = 168) ( Table 2). ...

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... Stigmatized and excluded from mainstream society, for example, people relapse as a direct consequence of the 'frustration and inability to secure a position in normal community life and establish everyday routines' beyond any physical and psychological barriers to recovery (Buchanan, 2004, p.394). Bukten et al. (2020) draw attention to the relationship between drug use in prison and the emergence of other adverse outcomes during and after imprisonment. Research has shown that prison time is often associated with the initiation of injection drug use (for review, see Boys et al., 2002). ...
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