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Pressure evolution during the AM under vacuum.

Pressure evolution during the AM under vacuum.

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Additive manufacturing (AM) is one of the most promising techniques for on-site manufacturing on extraterrestrial bodies. In this investigation, layerwise solar sintering under ambient and vacuum conditions targeting lunar exploration and a moon base was studied. A solar simulator was used in order to enable AM of interlockable building elements ou...

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... began prevented the use of a turbo-molecular pump to reach a higher vacuum level. The gas pressure within the chamber initially increased rapidly to over 200 mbar. Following this, the pressure increased linearly, at a rate of approximately 2.3 mbar=s until the end of the process. The pressure evolution graph during the AM process is shown in Fig. 5. ...

Citations

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