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Present distribution of signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) in Europe. ? Publications Scientifique MNHN, Paris, 2006. (After Souty-Grosset et al. 2006). The records of signal crayfish in Norway (Johnsen and Vr?lstad 2009, Slovakia (Maguire et al. 2008) and Croatia (Petrusek and Petruskova 2007), Estonia (Hurt and Kivistik 2009) and Jutland, Denmark (E. Byrnak pers. comm.) are not represented in the map.

Present distribution of signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) in Europe. ? Publications Scientifique MNHN, Paris, 2006. (After Souty-Grosset et al. 2006). The records of signal crayfish in Norway (Johnsen and Vr?lstad 2009, Slovakia (Maguire et al. 2008) and Croatia (Petrusek and Petruskova 2007), Estonia (Hurt and Kivistik 2009) and Jutland, Denmark (E. Byrnak pers. comm.) are not represented in the map.

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... The species Pacifastacus leniusculus has a similar appearance to that of the native noble crayfish (Astacus astacus), but it can be easily distinguished by its characteristic white- turquoise patch on the upper side of the chelae, smoother chelae surface, and the absence of spines on the carapace shoulders, behind cervical groove (Johnsen & Taugbøl, 2010). The total body length of adult specimens is up to 15 cm for male and 13.4 cm for female (Capurro et al., 2015). ...
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