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Precision versus accuracy. The bullseye represents the true value, e.g., the true location of the object, while black dots represent measurements, e.g., the estimated 3D locations of the object based on the 2D images. Source: http://www.antarcticglaciers.org/glacial-geology/dating-glacial-sediments2/precision-and-accuracy-glacial-geology/. Accessed 7.4.2016.

Precision versus accuracy. The bullseye represents the true value, e.g., the true location of the object, while black dots represent measurements, e.g., the estimated 3D locations of the object based on the 2D images. Source: http://www.antarcticglaciers.org/glacial-geology/dating-glacial-sediments2/precision-and-accuracy-glacial-geology/. Accessed 7.4.2016.

Context in source publication

Context 1
... applications of high metric accuracy 1 , such as topographical surveys, image locations are usually transformed into a real world coordinate system (i.e., georeferencing). However, in forensic mass grave excavations high relative accuracy (i.e., precision 2 ) is often more important than high metric accuracy (Figure 2), therefore knowing the scale of the images (i.e., a distance in an image the ground distance of which is known) and the generated outputs is often all that is required. In (forensic) archaeology, it is the relative location and context of evidence rather than their accurate spatial location that is required to derive most of the meaning from a mass grave site. ...

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... In comparison to the traditional approach, forensic photogrammetry is a sort of close-range photogrammetry that quickly and accurately maps crash and crime scenes. The conventional application of DSLR in forensic photogrammetry is labour-intensive, intrusive, subjective in terms of data collecting, and has very few options for presenting the data to a court [9]. Today, one of the most beneficial and affordable sources of spatial data for photogrammetry is available for forensic use. ...
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... Application in scene documentation is limited, however, and a photogrammetry-rendered evidentiary model has not yet been submitted into a court of law (7). Prior documentation research has utilized models that are generated with AgiSoft's PhotoScan, a black box commercial software (7,8,9,10,11). Open-source SfM software has not yet been tested in the same manner, and represents an option for reconstructions that would fall under the Daubert criteria (7). ...
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