Table 2 - uploaded by Christopher Boyle
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Pre-intervention means and standard deviations categorized by group. 

Pre-intervention means and standard deviations categorized by group. 

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An increased focus on youth development has led to an understanding of the importance of the wellbeing, resilience and mental health of children and young people. As a result there is a growing body of research, especially over the last two decades, which increasingly recognises the complexities of learning and development across the years spent at...

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... significant differences in any of the other measures of interest were observed (age, grade, gender, attribution style, or academic skill). Pre-intervention means and standard deviations are displayed in Table 2. ...

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