TABLE 1 - uploaded by Christopher Boyle
Content may be subject to copyright.
- Pre-and Post-Intervention Means and Standard Deviations of Scores for Control and Intervention Groups

- Pre-and Post-Intervention Means and Standard Deviations of Scores for Control and Intervention Groups

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
The role of affective and cognitive factors in learning have long since been recognised as imperative determinants of the learning process. Maladaptive styles with which we perceive and explain accomplishments and failures in achievement outcomes have important motivational impact upon approach and avoidance behaviours towards academic tasks. Inter...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Gender differences in academic performance has received considerable attention over the years. Studies have found that even when there are no gender differences in math performance, female students exhibit larger levels of apprehension toward the subject and that this gap between the genders increases with time. This study investigates gender diffe...

Citations

... Eventually, it became clear that this simplistic view was limited and not cognizant of the wider issues of school belonging and engagement. Active school contributions through school engagement is now a widely accepted possible solution to decreasing academic motivation and achievement (Bosnjak et al., 2017;Chodkiewicz & Boyle, 2016;Fredricks et al., 2004). ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The theoretical and empirical literature has long included belonging as central to student engagement. Some conceptualizations and approaches have suggested that a student's sense of belonging is a central and founda-tional principle underpinning engagement. Engagement also contributes to a sense of belonging. Two distinct literatures have developed insights around the importance of, pathways to, and outcomes associated with each construct. This chapter narratively explores similarities and differences between belonging and student engagement, identifying areas of overlap as well as helpful distinctions, with implications for research and educational practice. Although the two are closely connected , these two friends are more effectively treated as complementary constructs, both of which are essential components for positive development in young people.
... Because cognitive style is associated with other mental health problems, such intervention could lead to broader benefits. There is evidence that cognitive style can be altered using cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) [49,50], and that CBT for other mental disorders also reduces problem drinking [51,52]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Aims Having a negative cognitive style may lead someone to feel hopeless about his or her situation and be more likely to engage in coping-motivated drinking. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between cognitive style and drinking to cope. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting The former Avon Health Authority in South West England. Participants 1,681 participants of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Measurements Participants completed cognitive style questions at age 17 and a subset of drinking to cope questions at age 24. We used linear regression to test the association between cognitive style and drinking to cope, controlling for confounders. Alcohol consumption and dependence scales were included in a secondary analysis. Findings A 20 point increase (which was the standard deviation of the exposure variable) in cognitive style score at age 17 was associated with an increase of 0.24 in drinking to cope scores at age 24 after adjustment for confounding variables (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.08-0.41, p=.003). We found no evidence of an association between cognitive style and alcohol consumption (coefficient=0.03, 95% CI=-0.08-0.14, p=.591) before or after adjustment. There was evidence for an association with alcohol dependence but this was not present after adjusting for confounders (coefficient=0.01, 95% CI=-0.04-0.05, p=.769). Conclusions In young adults in England, there appears to be a positive association between negative cognitive style and subsequent drinking to cope.
... One challenge for the educators working with elementary students is, therefore, to address explicitly students' selfefficacy beliefs, to strengthen them, and their causal attributions, to promote attribution to controllable factors. In this connection, scholars have recommended helping students to set clear, measurable and achievable goals, using peer modeling, assisting students in the self-evaluation of their progress and doing attributional retraining (Artino, 2012;Hanin & Van Nieuwenhoven, 2020;Bosnjak et al., 2017;Muenks et al., 2018). ...
Over the past two decades, the perennial low success rates of elementary students in mathematical problem solving and the difficulties experienced by teachers in meeting the various needs of their students with this type of task have become quite a hot topic. While there is a general consensus among education scholars about the crucial role played by cognitive, emotional and motivational self-regulatory processes in mathematical problem-solving learning and performance, so far, no study has looked simultaneously and finely at these three dimensions in specific profiles of students. That issue is the focus of this contribution. To gain fine-grained and complete understandings of the behaviours of “above average” and “below average” problem solvers, both research from educational psychology on emotion and motivation and the work done in mathematics education on the cognitive and metacognitive characteristics of these two learner profiles were called upon. This qualitative study conducted among 22 upper elementary students is based on a cross-analysis of their verbal and written output. The data revealed that inappropriate reading of the problem by “below average” learners masks a difficulty with taking all the relational calculations involved in the problem into account and a strong conception of the uselessness of the problem’s context. These behaviours do not improve during the solution process due to the absence of control and regulation strategies. Findings regarding “above-average” achievers make it possible to identify the most important cognitive, emotional, motivational and regulatory processes that go along with problem-solving expertise. Implications in terms of educational practices are also discussed.
... Eight reported favorable social/emotional outcomes, such as increased optimism and improved self-concept (Ardern, 2016;Cole et al., 2012;Hannen & Woods, 2012;Kittles & Atkinson, 2009;Squires & Caddick, 2012;Weeks, Hill, & Owen, 2017;Yates & Atkinson, 2011;Yeo & Choi, 2011). Four reported academic gains, such as improvements in reading skills (Bosnjak et al., 2017;Chodkiewicz & Boyle, 2016;Cockroft & Atkinson, 2017;Toland & Boyle, 2008) and four identified improvements in behavioral measures, such as academic enabling behaviors (Briesch DuBois et al., 2017;Cryer & Atkinson, 2015;Levine & Anshel, 2011;Snape & Atkinson, 2017). ...
... Variations in the measures, particularly those obtained as "follow-up" taken anywhere between one and 5 months post-intervention, make drawing conclusions about impact longevity of a therapeutic intervention difficult. The lack of consistency around the collection and timing of follow-up measures was problematic, because longevity and latent effects are important considerations, time may be needed for the therapeutic intervention to take effect (Bosnjak et al., 2017) and SEPs must be cognizant that interventions are not typically a "quick fix" but part of a longer process (Chodkiewicz & Boyle, 2016). Selecting which factors to measure can potentially mask the breadth of impact, particularly where students and teachers have differing aspirations for the therapeutic interventions (Briesch DuBois et al., 2017), or where there is ambiguity over how to define, and indeed measure abstract notions such as "managing anger" (Cole et al., 2012). ...
... Finally, a range of contrasting outcomes was noted in terms of evaluating the effectiveness of therapeutic delivery. Some studies claimed to be resource efficient (Bosnjak et al., 2017;Snape & Atkinson, 2017), whereas others were considered time-consuming (Chodkiewicz & Boyle, 2016;Toland & Boyle, 2008). Benefits of working systemically alongside school staff to support the CYP more broadly (Ardern, 2016;Yates & Atkinson, 2011) contrasted with logistical difficulties in therapeutic delivery (Weeks et al., 2017). ...
Article
Full-text available
This systematic literature review establishes evidence for the use of therapeutic interventions delivered by school and educational psychologists in school settings and the extent to which these emulate recent therapeutic practice guidance. Peer-reviewed, empirical studies within the 10-year period 2008–2017 (inclusive) describing recognized targeted and specialist therapeutic interventions were located via systematic searching. Findings revealed that studies included a range of individual and small group therapeutic interventions, involving diverse participants, foci, therapeutic modalities, and formats. Benchmarking against therapeutic practice guidance revealed differences in the quality of the therapeutic interventions. Implications for improving contracting, strengthening effective therapeutic practice and measuring impact are considered.
... It follows that developmental aspects outside school may be highly influential vis-à-vis school belonging. The results from this research seems to indicate that students who can be regarded as having "positively functioning parents" may have more positive attributions for success and failure in learning and other events (Bosnjak et al., 2017;Chodkiewicz, & Boyle, 2014. Furthermore, it could be argued that if a person's self-efficacy is strong then dealing with negative situations which invariable will occur then they will be better prepared to positively deal with any arising difficulties. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
As we have seen in this authoritative book, as well as that of the wider literature, school belonging is generally regarded as a student’s sense of affiliation or connection to his or her school. Anyone who has personally navigated the sometimes-difficult terrain of secondary school is able to have some level of direct understanding as to the importance that belonging, fitting in, and identifying with a school holds for most people. Educators and practitioners often work with young people who feel that they do not belong to the school community, which they attend. An absence of belonging can manifest itself in mental health concerns, school attrition and risk-taking behaviours. Opportunities for early intervention through fostering school belonging are born from a greater understanding and awareness of what school belonging is and how it is contextualised and fostered. School belonging is perennially important and marks a significant social issue of our time. The aim of this final chapter is to consider the key messages of the foregoing chapters, as well as relating them to the wider literature on school belonging.
... It is the micro-moments of interactions that can make the difference and although often seen as the soft side of education it is becoming clearer that this has far more impact than hitherto acknowledged. Programmes in school that focus on wellbeing through utilising positive psychology (Seligman et al., 2009;Roffey, 2014 and attributions retraining (Bosnjak et al., 2017;Chodkiewicz & Boyle, 2014 alongside many others, demonstrate there is much more awareness of the importance of social interaction and wellbeing in schools nowadays. The school experience at the individual level is paramount. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Recent world events have led to an increased sense of collective fear directed to those perceived as outside the mainstream. This chapter posits that much of that fear is generated by beliefs about others, often stirred by a negative media and political interests. This is also true of those who engage in terrorism – their acts are driven by beliefs that comprise not so much religious faith as a way of making sense of the world. There is much evidence to suggest that military responses to terrorism are counter-productive as are programs aimed at identifying at risk individuals (Byrne, 2017). It has been suggested that more effective anti-terrorism strategies need to focus on the ‘normality’ of people who commit atrocities and intervene early. This includes both community engagement and building an educational climate that breaks down stereotypes and addresses both values and compassion (Singer & Bolz, 2013).
... It follows that developmental aspects outside school may be highly influential vis-à-vis school belonging. The results from this research seems to indicate that students who can be regarded as having "positively functioning parents" may have more positive attributions for success and failure in learning and other events (Bosnjak et al., 2017;Chodkiewicz, & Boyle, 2014. Furthermore, it could be argued that if a person's self-efficacy is strong then dealing with negative situations which invariable will occur then they will be better prepared to positively deal with any arising difficulties. ...
Chapter
As we have seen in this authoritative book, as well as that of the wider literature, school belonging is generally regarded as a student’s sense of affiliation or connection to his or her school. Anyone who has personally navigated the sometimes-difficult terrain of secondary school is able to have some level of direct understanding as to the importance that belonging, fitting in, and identifying with a school holds for most people. Educators and practitioners often work with young people who feel that they do not belong to the school community, which they attend. An absence of belonging can manifest itself in mental health concerns, school attrition and risk-taking behaviours. Opportunities for early intervention through fostering school belonging are born from a greater understanding and awareness of what school belonging is and how it is contextualised and fostered. School belonging is perennially important and marks a significant social issue of our time. The aim of this final chapter is to consider the key messages of the foregoing chapters, as well as relating them to the wider literature on school belonging. This book, through 12 chapters, demonstrates that school belonging research is diverse. This collection of chapters presents a collection of mixed research designs, methodologies, and participants.
... By their very definition labelling students with terms which can be regarded as being negative can affect teachers attitudes to inclusion of students with various levels of need (Kraska & Boyle, 2014;Boyle & Sharma, 2015, Anderson &, 2015. There are various programmes in schools which were initially designed mainly to support students with SEN, however it was found that in a mainstream environment they were just as effective as they enhanced confidence and self-esteem irrespective of difficulty (Bosnjak et al., 2017;Chodkiewicz & Boyle, 2014, 2016Koles & Boyle, 2013). Extra provisions can be provided even without terms like 'special needs' and 'children and young people with SEN'. ...
Article
Full-text available
Aim This article aims to explore whether labelling children and young people with Special Educational Needs and disabilities is still helpful or whether this leads to more discrimination, exclusion and stigmatisation, according to Becker’s labelling theory. Method Based on reviewing Special Educational Needs literature, this study begins with an exploration of advantages of assigning labels to children and young people with Special Educational Needs, such as determining appropriate provision and extra support. Also, it investigates the tendency of Special Educational Needs labels to negatively affect individuals in various ways such as their educational and employment futures. By considering labelling theory, this paper considers a crucial question in just who has the power to establish and assign labels to children and young people with Special Educational Needs or disabilities? Findings In a succinct way, findings indicate that conceptualising disability and impairment according to medical and social models allows professionals to classify people with SEN according to normalising judgements of diagnosis and identification. Conclusion The paper concludes that the drawbacks of SEN labelling seem to outweigh its advantages. Thus, it suggests to change the current label to be more alleviated and harmless.