Fig 8 - uploaded by David Radke
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Powerplay scenario for the Orange team, showing the best passing lanes to each player at times t and t + i. At time t (left figure), Player #86 has the puck. Our new passing lane model identifies the 1-bank lane to Player #3 as being the most open (twice as large as the direct lane). Player #86 chooses this lane for their pass (purple line). At time t + i (right figure), after Player #3 receives the pass, the cross-ice lane to #28 increases from 0.3 to 0.98 (a factor of 2.3). Completing this pass is known as an "up-and-over" on the powerplay.

Powerplay scenario for the Orange team, showing the best passing lanes to each player at times t and t + i. At time t (left figure), Player #86 has the puck. Our new passing lane model identifies the 1-bank lane to Player #3 as being the most open (twice as large as the direct lane). Player #86 chooses this lane for their pass (purple line). At time t + i (right figure), after Player #3 receives the pass, the cross-ice lane to #28 increases from 0.3 to 0.98 (a factor of 2.3). Completing this pass is known as an "up-and-over" on the powerplay.

Source publication
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The implementation of a puck and player tracking (PPT) system in the National Hockey League (NHL) provides significant opportunities to utilize high-resolution spatial and temporal data for advanced hockey analytics. In this paper, we develop a technique to classify pass types in the tracking data as either Direct, 1-bank, or Rim passes. We also ad...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... that in Figure 7a the x-axis is centered around 1 and is limited to a maximum of 2, since if γ d is much larger than γ i , the γ-ratio grows instead of trending to zero. For an in-game scenario, Figure 8 (left) in Section 7 shows how our model captures the 1-bank passing lane from Player #86 (who has possession of the puck) up to Player #3, whereas our previous model [8] does not. For this pass, the γ-ratio = 0. ...
Context 2
... reviewing video of games, our passing lane model would give players and coaches quantitative data for the availability of passing lanes to devise new plays or assess performance. For example, the "up-and-over" is a common powerplay sequence to shift the defence to a new side of the ice and open passing lanes to certain players, shown in Figure 8. Using our models, coaches would be able to adjust the location of offensive or defensive players to find positioning to increase passing lane sizes, or to reduce the size of an opponent's passing lanes. ...