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Potentials estimated for year 2020, the potentials should be measured from the x-axis to the upper edge of the respective color.

Potentials estimated for year 2020, the potentials should be measured from the x-axis to the upper edge of the respective color.

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Conference Paper
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The overall objective of the Biomass Energy Europe (BEE) project is to improve the accuracy and comparability of future biomass resource assessments for energy by reducing heterogeneity, increasing harmonisation and exchanging knowledge. First, similarities and differences between the various approaches, methodologies and datasets used in biomass r...

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... 1. The availability of land for energy crop production in different countries in the EU 15. Figure 2 provides an overview of biomass potentials of forestry and forestry residues of some of the studies that are investigated. More results will be made available in the future. ...

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Citations

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