Table 1 - uploaded by Katherine Boydell
Content may be subject to copyright.
Potential of technology to enhance child and youth mental health (n=16) 

Potential of technology to enhance child and youth mental health (n=16) 

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
We describe the use of psychotropic medications among youth in treatment foster care (TFC). Data from 240 youth were coded to examine rates of medication use, including polypharmacy and an indicator of “questionable polypharmacy.” Fifty-nine percent of youth in TFC had taken a psychotropic medication within the past 2 months. Of the youth taking ps...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Migrant children underutilize mental health services (MHS), but differences according to age, reason for migration, type of problem, and time have not been thoroughly analyzed. We aimed to explore utilization of MHS among migrant children and youth and to study if the hypothesized lower utilization could be explained by fewer neurodevelopme...
Article
Full-text available
The clinical significance and the prognostic value of clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis, while substantially corroborated in adults, remains less firmly established in children and early adolescents. This follow-up study, developed within the Reggio Emilia At Risk Mental States project, is meant to contribute to the reduction of such lacuna, a...
Article
Full-text available
As youth near the transition to adulthood and aging out of the foster care system, exposure to stress increases, especially for youth who have less than adequate support systems. Although mental health problems among foster youth often continue into adulthood, service use decreases dramatically within a year of turning 18. Understanding how foster...
Article
Full-text available
Schools have become the main provider of services to children with mental health needs. Although there is substantial literature on barriers to implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in under-resourced school districts, less has been written on how to overcome those barriers. Providing mental health services in the school setting present...

Citations

... Using technology to provide mental health services to children and youth has been a promising practice for many years now (Boydell et al., 2013;Comer & Myers, 2016). Virtual modalities can help to address issues related to access and efficiency, and indeed some children/youth prefer to receive services in this way (Lal, 2019;Leblanc et al., 2019;McGrath et al., 2018;Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health, 2020b). ...
Article
Full-text available
Background The COVID-19 pandemic prompted an abrupt shift in the delivery of community-based child and youth mental health services as virtual care was rapidly adopted. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sector-wide transition to virtual care across Ontario, with a focus on implementation facilitators and barriers. Methods We used a multi-level mixed-methods design where agency leaders, service providers, and clients shared their experiences planning, implementing, and accessing virtual care. In total, 97 agency leaders, and 192 youth and family members responded to the surveys; 13 agency leaders, and 11 service providers participated in interviews or focus groups. Results Most agencies undertook a similar journey to implement virtual care. Stakeholders described common facilitators such as staff engagement, leadership support, and training activities. Barriers included internet connection issues, lack of resources, and privacy concerns. Service providers innovated as they implemented by partnering with agencies to meet clients’ needs, using multiple platforms to engage clients, and altering session duration to reduce fatigue. Clients found virtual care easy to use, felt confident using it, and intend to continue accessing virtual care. Conclusion Implementation of virtual care during the pandemic was complex and the evaluation involved obtaining perspectives at multiple levels. This research provides a blueprint for evaluations of the implementation of virtual mental health services, particularly in a child/youth context. Virtual care is a viable way to deliver mental health services, however, equity, accessibility, and appropriateness need to be addressed to ensure services are effective for children, youth, and their families. Plain language abstract Academic literature suggests that using technology to deliver child and youth mental health services is a promising way to enhance access to care and improve engagement for many children and youth. Despite this, the provision of virtual child and youth mental health services in Ontario prior to the COVID-19 pandemic was limited. Efforts that did exist were largely focused on providing care to those in rural and remote areas. The COVID-19 pandemic prompted a rapid shift to virtual care, as most in-person mental health services were suspended. This paper presents new insight into how virtual mental health services were quickly established and used across Ontario from the perspectives of senior leaders, service providers, and clients. Results from this evaluation showed that agencies followed similar steps to prepare to use virtual services. Staff engagement, support from leadership, and opportunities for staff training supported the implementation of virtual care while internet connections issues, lack of resources (like computers or phones), and privacy and safety concerns hindered the implementation. Most youth and family members found virtual services easy to use and intend to continue using them. Most agencies intend to continue to offer virtual services post-pandemic but noted that it was not appropriate or accessible for all clients. This study provides a foundation for additional research to examine situations and conditions that are most conducive to virtual care delivery to address child and youth mental health concerns. These results may encourage agencies to rely more confidently on virtual services as another means to meet clients’ needs and preferences.
... As shown in Table 1, of the nine government and organizational documents, five focused primarily on eMental healthcare services for youth [17,[37][38][39][40] while the remaining discussed eMental healthcare for the general population, including youth [41][42][43]. Although some reports contained research elements (i.e., literature reviews, stakeholder interviews, surveys) [38-40, 42, 44], they were categorized as government/organizational documents given their affiliations. ...
... Although some reports contained research elements (i.e., literature reviews, stakeholder interviews, surveys) [38-40, 42, 44], they were categorized as government/organizational documents given their affiliations. Four documents originated from Australia [37,38,43,44], two from the United Kingdom [39,42], two from Canada [17,40], and one from the Netherlands [41]. Following quality assessment, one document was found to be of poor quality To identify the barriers impacting eHealth readiness and adoption and explore how to minimize them 3. To identify eHealth enablers and explore how to apply them to drive adoption and effective usage -Government -Healthcare professionals ✓ (25%) and was not to be recommended for use [41], six documents were found to be of medium quality (range 58-83%) and were recommended for use given modification [17, 37-39, 42, 44], and two documents were found to be of high quality (92%) and were recommended for use without modifications [40,43] (see Additional file 3). ...
... Four documents originated from Australia [37,38,43,44], two from the United Kingdom [39,42], two from Canada [17,40], and one from the Netherlands [41]. Following quality assessment, one document was found to be of poor quality To identify the barriers impacting eHealth readiness and adoption and explore how to minimize them 3. To identify eHealth enablers and explore how to apply them to drive adoption and effective usage -Government -Healthcare professionals ✓ (25%) and was not to be recommended for use [41], six documents were found to be of medium quality (range 58-83%) and were recommended for use given modification [17, 37-39, 42, 44], and two documents were found to be of high quality (92%) and were recommended for use without modifications [40,43] (see Additional file 3). Table 2 outlines the 20 research studies included in the review. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Researchers, healthcare planners, and policymakers convey a sense of urgency in using eMental healthcare technologies to improve pediatric mental healthcare availability and access. Yet, different stakeholders may focus on different aspects of implementation. We conducted a systematic review to identify implementation foci in research studies and government/organizational documents for eMental healthcare technologies for pediatric mental healthcare. Methods A search of eleven electronic databases and grey literature was conducted. We included research studies and documents from organization and government websites if the focus included eMental healthcare technology for children/adolescents (0–18 years), and implementation was studied and reported (research studies) or goals/recommendations regarding implementation were made (documents). We assessed study quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and document quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation II. Implementation information was grouped according to Proctor and colleagues’ implementation outcomes—acceptability, adoption, appropriateness, cost, feasibility, fidelity, penetration, and sustainability—and grouped separately for studies and documents. Results Twenty research studies and nine government/organizational documents met eligibility criteria. These articles represented implementation of eMental healthcare technologies in the USA (14 studies), United Kingdom (2 documents, 3 studies), Canada (2 documents, 1 study), Australia (4 documents, 1 study), New Zealand (1 study), and the Netherlands (1 document). The quality of research studies was excellent (n = 11), good (n = 6), and poor (n = 1). These eMental health studies focused on the acceptability (70%, n = 14) and appropriateness (50%, n = 10) of eMental healthcare technologies to users and mental healthcare professionals. The quality of government and organizational documents was high (n = 2), medium (n = 6), and low (n = 1). These documents focused on cost (100%, n = 9), penetration (89%, n = 8), feasibility (78%, n = 7), and sustainability (67%, n = 6) of implementing eMental healthcare technology. Conclusion To date, research studies have largely focused on acceptability and appropriateness, while government/organizational documents state goals and recommendations regarding costs, feasibility, and sustainability of eMental healthcare technologies. These differences suggest that the research evidence available for pediatric eMental healthcare technologies does not reflect the focus of governments and organizations. Partnerships between researchers, healthcare planners, and policymakers may help to align implementation research with policy development, decision-making, and funding foci. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13012-017-0608-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
... Mental health organizations have been slow to adopt the technology; of 48 mental health organization survey respondents, 18.8% identified using smartphone applications (apps) and no respondents reported using them to deliver treatment (Boydell et al., 2013). ...
Article
Interconnectedness through technology presents both challenges and opportunities for suicide prevention and intervention with adolescents and families. The time following discharge from acute care facilities represents a critical period of suicide risk for adolescents, which could be buffered by a technological intervention they could use post-discharge. Crisis Care is a smartphone application intervention developed specifically for suicidal adolescents and their parents to use during this period of increased risk. A web-based prototype of Crisis Care was pilot tested with 20 adolescent-parent dyads. Results demonstrated acceptability and usability, suggesting the utility of technological interventions, such as Crisis Care, as an adjunct to treatment for suicidal adolescents and their parents following discharge from acute care settings.
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To conduct a scoping review on the use of technology to deliver mental health services to children and youth in order to identify the breadth of peer-reviewed literature, summarize findings and identify gaps. Method: A literature database search identified 126 original studies meeting criteria for review. Descriptive numerical summary and thematic analyses were conducted. Two reviewers independently extracted data. Results: Studies were characterized by diverse technologies including videoconferencing, telephone and mobile phone applications and Internet-based applications such as email, web sites and CD-ROMs. Conclusion: The use of technologies plays a major role in the delivery of mental health services and supports to children and youth in providing prevention, assessment, diagnosis, counseling and treatment programs. Strategies are growing exponentially on a global basis, thus it is critical to study the impact of these technologies on child and youth mental health service delivery. An in-depth review and synthesis of the quality of findings of studies on effectiveness of the use of technologies in service delivery are also warranted. A full systematic review would provide that opportunity.