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... geographic areas most frequently considered were Canada and the United Kingdom. These results are shown in Figures 2 and 3. ...

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... However, there are still challenges to connect scientific evidence with policymaking, including differences between the type of evidence that researchers produced and the form of evidence that policymakers need (Cairney & Oliver, 2020;Rose, 2017). The complexity and timeliness of scientific data are just some of the barriers to the use of scientific work for policymaking (Newman, 2020). There have been works exploring different routes to overcome these challenges, including knowledge brokering and translations (Mols et al., 2020), institutionalised collaborative practices (Estabrooks et al., 2019), promoting an organisational culture of scientific advice in policy through leadership (Van der Arend, 2014), among others. ...
... Traditionally, most academic work has focused on understanding scientific advice for executive branches (Kenny et al., 2017). Consequently, recent systematic analyzes have focused on executive advisory processes (Newman, 2020;Oliver & Cairney, 2019). Hence, we asked ourselves: what is the current state-of-the-art knowledge about legislative advisory bodies and their advice processes? ...
... Examples of this trend can be found in the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the new behavioural science unit in the US Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the UK networks of 'What Works' evidence centres. a) Recommendations for knowledge brokering and translation: moving from the scientific to the policy sphere Another critical element discussed by experts in various fields is the need for adequate knowledge brokering (Newman, 2020), i.e. the transition from predominantly scientific or academic to outputs that are engaging and easily of use for legislators (Oliver & Boaz, 2019;Rose, 2017). Examples of strategies to achieve this could be increased use of data visualisation (Rose, 2017), reduced scientific jargon (Kenny et al., 2017), institutionalised collaborative practices (Estabrooks et al., 2019), and promotion of an organisational culture of scientific advice in policy through leadership (Van der Arend, 2014). ...
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Science advice has received renewed attention for evidence-informed legislation. However, no work has evaluated current trends in the field. We did a systematic review for publications between 2014 and 2020 to develop a typology using the legislative scientific advice body as a unit of analysis. The typology includes 12 categories that provide insights into the contextual background, mandate, structure, and advice process of legislative advisory bodies. We noticed that most of the work focused on advisory units is in western and high-income countries. The bodies show a wide degree of advice practices and politicisation. There are open opportunities for research, such as doing further comparative analyzes. Lastly, we found that foresight and horizon scanning methodologies were increasingly implemented in legislatures for participatory advice and to set long-term priorities. The findings can shed light on advancing legislative scientific advice for researchers and practitioners alike.
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Governments across the globe have expressed their interest in forms of codesign and coproduction as a useful tool for crafting policy solutions. Genuine relationships between partners are seen as an important way to build meaningful and lasting impact for policy. One area of interest in this space has been on how researchers and policymakers can work better together to design and produce more evidence-based policies. For many practitioners and researchers, knowledge coproduction is presented as a panacea to the ongoing challenges of research translation. It is positioned as assisting in building more meaningful, trusting relationships which, in turn, support the development of more effective policy solutions. Using the insider experience of a coproduced government project in Queensland, Australia, this paper reflects on the realities and tensions between this idealism associated with policy co-production methodologies and the ongoing messiness of public policy practice. Beginning with an overview of the literature on coproduction, followed by a brief introduction to the case and the method used, the paper concludes by highlighting the strengths, facilitators and benefits of the approach while raising questions about whether coproduction is a panacea to research translation concerns or a placebo. The answer, we argue, lies more in how success is defined than any concrete solution.