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Physical and mechanical properties of crushed limestone aggregates.

Physical and mechanical properties of crushed limestone aggregates.

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This paper investigates the effects of cement content and water/cement ratio on workable fresh concrete properties with slump changing between 90 to 110 mm, and determines the relations among fresh concrete properties such as slump, compacting factor, VeBe, unit weight and setting times of mortar with temperature history. The experiments were condu...

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... Cyprus is an Island, high class cement is generally preferred due to durability requirements. Its physical and chemical properties are shown in Table 2. Four types of crushed limestone aggregates with maximum sizes of 20, 14, 10 and 5 mm were used (Table 3). According to BS 882 (1992), aggregates were combined and proportioned (Figure 1). ...

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... e qualities of fresh concrete are important. Consistency and workability of fresh concrete are significant requirements for the proportion of concrete mixes as well as important features that impact the placing of fresh concrete onsite and the subsequent performance of hardened concrete [39]. Various tests are conducted to analyze the properties of freshly mixed concrete, such as the slump test, slump flowability, compaction factor, and density of freshly mixed concrete. ...
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... Among three mixes, the 1:1:2 mix showed a higher slump value compared to 1:1.5:3 and 1:2:4 mixes, respectively, due to the high amount of fine cement in the mix and reducing the content of aggregate, this works as a lubricant and reduces the internal friction among the particles or aggregates, and consequently, the factor of compacting and the workability raise [23]. Komal's close results reported that the concrete is richer for the lower ratio of aggregate/cement. ...
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... The amount of cement used in concrete influences not only the properties of the fresh concrete, which include workability, density, time of setting, and temperature, but also the properties of the hardened concrete, which include strength, shrinkage, permeability, and cracking potential. Increasing CPV of concrete mixes can provide concrete can better workability and a quicker setting time (Marar, K., and Eren, Ö, 2011). However, the concrete will lose its workability and become sticky if the concrete has excessively high CPV. ...