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Photos of latent fingerprints on the aluminum foil surface spattered using (a) powdered quantum dots, (b) white powder, and (c) aluminum powder 9 

Photos of latent fingerprints on the aluminum foil surface spattered using (a) powdered quantum dots, (b) white powder, and (c) aluminum powder 9 

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Article
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The identification of latent fingerprints is crucial for the security agencies in order to identify persons suspected of having committed criminal acts. Latent prints often remain as random impressions onto the surfaces of various objects. Huge progress has been made in the identification processes using rolled and plain impressions fingerprints, w...

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Context 1
... Cadmium ions are chelated within a chitosan matrice by rapid addition of sodium sulfide to form particles of CdS/ chitosan nanocomposite. 29 Fresh deposited non-fumed cyanoacrylate latent fingerprint on the aluminum foil was clearly observed under Rofin 30 light at 450 nm when spattered with prepared suspension together with surfactant (Tergitol 31 ), allowing formation of powder surfactant/quantum dot (Figure 3). Quantum dots powder has been successfully used to develop latent finger- prints on aluminum foil, with distinctive characteristics of the ridges. ...
Context 2
... Cadmium ions are chelated within a chitosan matrice by rapid addition of sodium sulfide to form particles of CdS/ chitosan nanocomposite. 29 Fresh deposited non-fumed cyanoacrylate latent fingerprint on the aluminum foil was clearly observed under Rofin 30 light at 450 nm when spattered with prepared suspension together with surfactant (Tergitol 31 ), allowing formation of powder surfactant/quantum dot (Figure 3). Quantum dots powder has been successfully used to develop latent finger- prints on aluminum foil, with distinctive characteristics of the ridges. ...

Citations

... The fingerprint of a human being, is influenced by heredity and environment, exhibits a property of uniqueness [1][2][3], and has already become important evidence in criminal investigations and convictions [2,[4][5][6]. Generally, there are three common types of fingerprint evidence at crime scenes: Impression (or indented) fingerprints, visible (or patent) fingerprints, and latent fingerprints [6]. ...
Article
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The recognition of fingerprints has played an extremely important role in criminal investigations, due to its uniqueness. This paper reports on the recognition of sweat latent fingerprints using green-emitting, environment-friendly carbon dots prepared with DL-malic acid and ethylenediamine, and the exploration of impacting factors in the development process of fingerprints. The experiments showed that better fingerprint images could be obtained when the latent fingerprints are developed in green-emitting carbon dots with pH 9 for 30 min, at room temperature. The reported method was also effective for latent fingerprints on a variety of substrates, as well as for those water-immersed ones, where the developed fingerprint remained stable after long-term preservation. Furthermore, the fluorescent three-dimensional fingerprint image could provide direct and simple evidence on pressing habits. The objective of this paper was to present this method. The method may help to narrow the range of suspects during criminal investigations and in forensic science.
Conference Paper
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Efforts to develop and codify uniform rules for different categories of migrants run into obstacles due to different approaches of states on all major status issues. In order to solve this problem, international community is increasingly working on the adoption of global migration policies in line with the international legal framework. The mentioned approach aims to avoid the existing inconsistency of legislative solutions and particularity of practice at the internal legal level. Given the mentioned circumstances, the author of this study will try to point out the importance of positive legal rules and principles from the corpus of international refugee law and human rights law for harmonizing the legal status of different categories of migrants.
Article
Most chemical and physical methods employed in visualizing latent marks have shown detrimental effects on human health and, therefore, some research groups have directed their attention to the utilization of various (bio)polymers with the aforementioned purpose. Although chitosan is widely used in medicine, pharmacy, food, and drug delivery systems, there are very few studies that address this biopolymer utilization in forensic applications, such as the detection of latent fingerprints. We used chitosan crosslinked with sodium tripolyphosphate and conjugated with L-lysine to enhance the visualization of latent fingerprints, due to its ability to interact with fingerprint sweat residues. These conjugates were prepared using different (w/w) amounts of chitosan and tripolyphosphate (6/1; 4/1; 1/1; 1/4; and 1/6), and those with the most promising results (i.e., 6/1 formulation) were investigated in detail. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed interactions between components of the systems. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed that prepared powder formulations were uniform in size and confirmed that chitosan/tripolyphosphate/lysine conjugates bind easily to the sweat and lipid residues present in the latent fingerprints. The testing of prepared conjugates demonstrated the potential of these systems as bio-based powder substitution for commercially available powders.