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Phase diagram for nitric acid and water. 6  

Phase diagram for nitric acid and water. 6  

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This study explores different technologies for removing acetic acid from a UREX + waste stream. The waste stream contains both nitric and acetic acids, and the acetic acid must be removed from the waste stream to prevent potential problems in the downstream steps as well as affecting the recycle of nitric acid. The acetic acid is formed after the U...

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... 9 In the PUREX process, TcO 4 − is extracted under various forms, in particular as mixed U−nitrate− pertechnetate complexes, requiring further steps (e.g., UREX + process) to separate Tc from the major actinides. 10,11 TcO 4 − has high mobility in the environment and is difficult to complex. It is thus important, from a practical and a fundamental perspective, to characterize its relationship with respect to uranyl (either a mere noncoordinated neutralizing counterion or an effective ligand) in different liquid environments. ...
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