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Personal appeal average ratings for code-switching, English and Spanish female and male speakers. 

Personal appeal average ratings for code-switching, English and Spanish female and male speakers. 

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... participants gave higher ratings to English overall, regardless of the gender of the speaker (p-value = 0.001). In Edinburg, male participants rated English higher overall (p-value = 0.0010); this difference was statistically significant for both the female (p-value = 0.0259) and the male speakers (p-value = 0.0090) (see Figure 6). Female participants in Edinburg rated English higher overall as well (p- value = 0.0001), and found the female speakers more personally appealing when using English (p-value = 0.0028), whereas differences for male speakers were not statistically significant (see Figure 6). ...
Context 2
... Edinburg, male participants rated English higher overall (p-value = 0.0010); this difference was statistically significant for both the female (p-value = 0.0259) and the male speakers (p-value = 0.0090) (see Figure 6). Female participants in Edinburg rated English higher overall as well (p- value = 0.0001), and found the female speakers more personally appealing when using English (p-value = 0.0028), whereas differences for male speakers were not statistically significant (see Figure 6). Spanish and code-switching guises. ...
Context 3
... Edinburg, male participants rated Spanish higher than code-switching overall (p-value = 0.0007), and found the female speaker more personally appealing when using Spanish (p-value = 0.0042), where- as differences for male speakers were not statistically significant. Female partici- pants in Edinburg gave higher ratings to Spanish guises regardless of the gender of the speaker (p-value = 0.0001) (see Figure 6). ...
Context 4
... Edinburg, male participants gave similar scores to Spanish and English, and found the male speaker more personally appealing when speaking English (p-value = 0.0138). Female participants in Edinburg gave higher scores to Spanish guises (p-value = 0.0202), and gave higher scores to the female speakers when using Spanish (p-value = 0.0269) (see Figure 6). ...

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