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Pearson's correlation coefficients among female body size measures (body length, abdomen volume, body condition), voracity towards prey and duration of prey manipulation.

Pearson's correlation coefficients among female body size measures (body length, abdomen volume, body condition), voracity towards prey and duration of prey manipulation.

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Theory suggests that consistent individual variation in behavior relates to fitness, but few studies have empirically examined the role of personalities in mate choice, male-male competition and reproductive success. We observed the Mediterranean black widow, Latrodectus tredecimguttatus, in the individual and mating context, to test how body size...

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... exhibited consistent individual differences in both voracity towards prey and duration of prey manipulation (Table 1). Neither body length, abdomen volume nor body condition correlated to voracity towards prey or duration of prey manipulation (Table 2). Table 1. ...

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... Therefore, accumulating additional nutrient reserves (i.e., greater body mass) before maturity might provide them with an adaptive advantage. Furthermore, mating success is often associated with male size (Sivalinghem et al. 2010;Golobinek et al. 2021), and for example, in another jumping spider Phidippus clarus, heavier males were more successful in intraspecific male-male competition (Elias et al. 2008). As sex-specific selection forces favor males with larger body size (Fernández-Montraveta and Moya-Laraño 2007), to maximize their fitness outputs, accumulating nutrient reserves before maturity could be crucial for males. ...
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