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Paper-Based Survey (23 Students-Digital Design-BUE), Blue bars are the Mean. Red bars are the standard deviation 

Paper-Based Survey (23 Students-Digital Design-BUE), Blue bars are the Mean. Red bars are the standard deviation 

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Conference Paper
Full-text available
Web-based learning tools provide integrated environments of various technologies to support diverse educators’ and learners’ needs via the Internet. An open source Moodle eLearning platform has been implemented at universities in Egypt as an aid to deliver e-content and to provide the institution with various possibilities for implementing asynchro...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... i.e. using both qualitative and quantitative research methods of data collection. The research is quantitative as it measures the percentage of students' participation in online versus offline assignments. It is also qualitative as it depends on the results of feedback from a questionnaire given to students to evaluate their willingness to use e-learning. The qualitative results were obtained from questionnaire surveys administered to students at two universities in Egypt: The British University (BUE) is a private validated university [5] and Helwan a governmental university [2]. Both universities have relevant experience with e-learning and can offer insights into the factors affecting the present and future state of online education. The questionnaire (See Table 1) was administered to two different groups of students in the Data Structure Module at Helwan University [2]. The first group consisted of 17 students who participated in the completion of the paper-based survey, while the second group consisted of 25 students for the on-line survey. The results of the two surveys are shown in Figures 1 and 2. The Y axis in Figures 1 and 2 show the value of the mean for the responses of the students to the twelve questions as well as the value of the standard deviation. The maximum value of the mean is five (i.e. Strongly agree=5, Agree=4, Neither agree nor disagree=3, Disagree=2, Strongly disagree=1). Figure 4 shows the results of the Computer Graphics module, Figure 5 presents the results of the Digital Design module at the BUE, and Figure 7 illustrates the results for English modules at the BUE. It is important to note that English modules are compulsory for all students in the different Faculties at the BUE. English is taken alongside the degree area modules and students must pass it. The students, who are studying English module belong to all faculties at BUE. using The Since The the qualitative participants the interactive aim of results this of features the research were research of obtained e-learning was were to determine from as natural an questionnaire important how groups. far The questionnaire (See Table 1) was administered to asset e-learning surveys This means in teaching administered has that the adult helped students students. to to students increase were enrolled at the two motivation and universities studying of in at two In different this paper groups the p-value of students has been in the used. Data p-value Structure is a students Egypt: the two The universities towards British learning University before a the subject, (BUE) research is a twofold a had private begun. task validated They was probability Module at statement Helwan University which answers [2]. the The question: first group If the conducted, university were students [5] i.e. and at using the Helwan British both a qualitative governmental University and [5] university quantitative and Helwan [2]. Null consisted Hypothesis of 17 is students true, then who what participated is the probability in the of research Both University universities methods [2]. Both have of universities relevant data collection. experience introduced The with e-learning research e-learning as is a observing completion test of the statistics paper-based at least survey, as extreme while the as the second one quantitative and learning can offer tool as insights it to measures into support the the factors traditional percentage affecting of face-to-face the students' present observed. group consisted A p-valu of 25 e students of 0.05 for or the less on-line rejects survey. the The null participation and lectures/classes. future state in online of Moodle online versus version education. offline 2.0 assignments. and higher is It used. is also E- hypothesis results of the "at two the surveys 5% level" are shown that in is, Figures the statistical 1 and 2. qualitative learning has as been it depends used as on an the essential results tool of feedback for the learning from a assumptions The Y axis in used Figures imply 1 that and only 2 show 5% the of the value time of would the mean the questionnaire process across given both universities. to students The to online evaluate survey their was supposed for the responses statistical of process the students produce to the a finding twelve questions this extreme as willingness administered to to use students e-learning. in the Faculty of Informatics and if well the as null the hypothesis value of the were standard true. deviation. 5% and 10% The are maximum common Computer Science, the English Department at the BUE and significance value of the levels mean is to five which (i.e. p-values Strongly are agree=5, compared. Agree=4, the Faculty of Computer Science and Information at Neither agree nor disagree=3, Disagree=2, Strongly Helwan University. This study was part of a longitudinal disagree=1). Figure 4 shows the results of the Computer effort to understand the use of technology in teaching Graphics module, Figure 5 presents the results of the within higher education. Digital Design module at the BUE, and Figure 7 illustrates the results for English modules at the BUE. It is important to note that English modules are compulsory for all students in the different Faculties at the BUE. English is taken alongside the degree area modules and students must pass it. The students, who are studying English module belong to all faculties at BUE. using The Since The the qualitative participants the interactive aim of results this of features the research were research of obtained e-learning was were to determine from as natural an questionnaire important how groups. far The questionnaire (See Table 1) was administered to asset e-learning surveys This means in teaching administered has that the adult helped students students. to to students increase were enrolled at the two motivation and universities studying of in at two In different this paper groups the p-value of students has been in the used. Data p-value Structure is a students Egypt: the two The universities towards British learning University before a the subject, (BUE) research is a twofold a had private begun. task validated They was probability Module at statement Helwan University which answers [2]. the The question: first group If the conducted, university were students [5] i.e. and at using the Helwan British both a qualitative governmental University and [5] university quantitative and Helwan [2]. Null consisted Hypothesis of 17 is students true, then who what participated is the probability in the of research Both University universities methods [2]. Both have of universities relevant data collection. experience introduced The with e-learning research e-learning as is a observing completion test of the statistics paper-based at least survey, as extreme while the as the second one quantitative and learning can offer tool as insights it to measures into support the the factors traditional percentage affecting of face-to-face the students' present observed. group consisted A p-valu of 25 e students of 0.05 for or the less on-line rejects survey. the The null participation and lectures/classes. future state in online of Moodle online versus version education. offline 2.0 assignments. and higher is It used. is also E- hypothesis results of the "at two the surveys 5% level" are shown that in is, Figures the statistical 1 and 2. qualitative learning has as been it depends used as on an the essential results tool of feedback for the learning from a assumptions The Y axis in used Figures imply 1 that and only 2 show 5% the of the value time of would the mean the questionnaire process across given both universities. to students The to online evaluate survey their was supposed for the responses statistical of process the students produce to the a finding twelve questions this extreme as willingness administered to to use students e-learning. in the Faculty of Informatics and if well the as null the hypothesis value of the were standard true. deviation. 5% and 10% The are maximum common Computer Science, the English Department at the BUE and significance value of the levels mean is to five which (i.e. p-values Strongly are agree=5, compared. Agree=4, the Faculty of Computer Science and Information at Neither agree nor disagree=3, Disagree=2, Strongly Helwan University. This study was part of a longitudinal disagree=1). Figure 4 shows the results of the Computer effort to understand the use of technology in teaching Graphics module, Figure 5 presents the results of the within higher education. Digital Design module at the BUE, and Figure 7 illustrates the results for English modules at the BUE. It is important to note that English modules are compulsory for all students in the different Faculties at the BUE. English is taken alongside the degree area modules and students must pass it. The students, who are studying English module belong to all faculties at BUE. The participants of the research were natural groups. This means that the students were enrolled and studying at the two universities before the research had begun. They were students at the British University [5] and Helwan University [2]. Both universities introduced e-learning as a learning tool to support traditional face-to-face lectures/classes. Moodle version 2.0 and higher is used. E- learning has been used as an essential tool for the learning process across both universities. The online survey was administered to students in the Faculty of Informatics and Computer Science, the English Department at the BUE and the Faculty of Computer Science and Information at Helwan University. This study was part of a longitudinal effort to understand the use of technology in teaching within higher education. The participants were given two different kinds of exercises to be answered at home for the duration of two successive weeks. They were: 1) Web Based Interactive Exercises; 2) Paper Based Exercises. ...
Context 2
... students of 0.05 for or the less on-line rejects survey. the The null participation and lectures/classes. future state in online of Moodle online versus version education. offline 2.0 assignments. and higher is It used. is also E- hypothesis results of the "at two the surveys 5% level" are shown that in is, Figures the statistical 1 and 2. qualitative learning has as been it depends used as on an the essential results tool of feedback for the learning from a assumptions The Y axis in used Figures imply 1 that and only 2 show 5% the of the value time of would the mean the questionnaire process across given both universities. to students The to online evaluate survey their was supposed for the responses statistical of process the students produce to the a finding twelve questions this extreme as willingness administered to to use students e-learning. in the Faculty of Informatics and if well the as null the hypothesis value of the were standard true. deviation. 5% and 10% The are maximum common Computer Science, the English Department at the BUE and significance value of the levels mean is to five which (i.e. p-values Strongly are agree=5, compared. Agree=4, the Faculty of Computer Science and Information at Neither agree nor disagree=3, Disagree=2, Strongly Helwan University. This study was part of a longitudinal disagree=1). Figure 4 shows the results of the Computer effort to understand the use of technology in teaching Graphics module, Figure 5 presents the results of the within higher education. Digital Design module at the BUE, and Figure 7 illustrates the results for English modules at the BUE. It is important to note that English modules are compulsory for all students in the different Faculties at the BUE. English is taken alongside the degree area modules and students must pass it. The students, who are studying English module belong to all faculties at BUE. using The Since The the qualitative participants the interactive aim of results this of features the research were research of obtained e-learning was were to determine from as natural an questionnaire important how groups. far The questionnaire (See Table 1) was administered to asset e-learning surveys This means in teaching administered has that the adult helped students students. to to students increase were enrolled at the two motivation and universities studying of in at two In different this paper groups the p-value of students has been in the used. Data p-value Structure is a students Egypt: the two The universities towards British learning University before a the subject, (BUE) research is a twofold a had private begun. task validated They was probability Module at statement Helwan University which answers [2]. the The question: first group If the conducted, university were students [5] i.e. and at using the Helwan British both a qualitative governmental University and [5] university quantitative and Helwan [2]. Null consisted Hypothesis of 17 is students true, then who what participated is the probability in the of research Both University universities methods [2]. Both have of universities relevant data collection. experience introduced The with e-learning research e-learning as is a observing completion test of the statistics paper-based at least survey, as extreme while the as the second one quantitative and learning can offer tool as insights it to measures into support the the factors traditional percentage affecting of face-to-face the students' present observed. group consisted A p-valu of 25 e students of 0.05 for or the less on-line rejects survey. the The null participation and lectures/classes. future state in online of Moodle online versus version education. offline 2.0 assignments. and higher is It used. is also E- hypothesis results of the "at two the surveys 5% level" are shown that in is, Figures the statistical 1 and 2. qualitative learning has as been it depends used as on an the essential results tool of feedback for the learning from a assumptions The Y axis in used Figures imply 1 that and only 2 show 5% the of the value time of would the mean the questionnaire process across given both universities. to students The to online evaluate survey their was supposed for the responses statistical of process the students produce to the a finding twelve questions this extreme as willingness administered to to use students e-learning. in the Faculty of Informatics and if well the as null the hypothesis value of the were standard true. deviation. 5% and 10% The are maximum common Computer Science, the English Department at the BUE and significance value of the levels mean is to five which (i.e. p-values Strongly are agree=5, compared. Agree=4, the Faculty of Computer Science and Information at Neither agree nor disagree=3, Disagree=2, Strongly Helwan University. This study was part of a longitudinal disagree=1). Figure 4 shows the results of the Computer effort to understand the use of technology in teaching Graphics module, Figure 5 presents the results of the within higher education. Digital Design module at the BUE, and Figure 7 illustrates the results for English modules at the BUE. It is important to note that English modules are compulsory for all students in the different Faculties at the BUE. English is taken alongside the degree area modules and students must pass it. The students, who are studying English module belong to all faculties at BUE. The participants of the research were natural groups. This means that the students were enrolled and studying at the two universities before the research had begun. They were students at the British University [5] and Helwan University [2]. Both universities introduced e-learning as a learning tool to support traditional face-to-face lectures/classes. Moodle version 2.0 and higher is used. E- learning has been used as an essential tool for the learning process across both universities. The online survey was administered to students in the Faculty of Informatics and Computer Science, the English Department at the BUE and the Faculty of Computer Science and Information at Helwan University. This study was part of a longitudinal effort to understand the use of technology in teaching within higher education. The participants were given two different kinds of exercises to be answered at home for the duration of two successive weeks. They were: 1) Web Based Interactive Exercises; 2) Paper Based Exercises. Students were asked to answer the exercises at home and were informed that they would not be graded. The exercises were balanced in terms of difficulty, number of questions, question types and the time given to answer each exercise. An online and paper based questionnaire was developed as an instrument for the qualitative part of this study. The questionnaire was designed to measure student attitudes towards e-learning for the modules to be included in the study. The questionnaire was adapted slightly to reflect the different modules the research was focusing on. The questionnaire consisted of 12 questions. Each question contained five Likert scales: Strongly agree=5, Agree=4, Neither agree nor disagree=3, Disagree=2, Strongly disagree=1 for each ...
Context 3
... the aim of this research was to determine how far e-learning has helped to increase the motivation of students towards learning a subject, a twofold task was conducted, i.e. using both qualitative and quantitative research methods of data collection. The research is quantitative as it measures the percentage of students' participation in online versus offline assignments. It is also qualitative as it depends on the results of feedback from a questionnaire given to students to evaluate their willingness to use e-learning. The qualitative results were obtained from questionnaire surveys administered to students at two universities in Egypt: The British University (BUE) is a private validated university [5] and Helwan a governmental university [2]. Both universities have relevant experience with e-learning and can offer insights into the factors affecting the present and future state of online education. The questionnaire (See Table 1) was administered to two different groups of students in the Data Structure Module at Helwan University [2]. The first group consisted of 17 students who participated in the completion of the paper-based survey, while the second group consisted of 25 students for the on-line survey. The results of the two surveys are shown in Figures 1 and 2. The Y axis in Figures 1 and 2 show the value of the mean for the responses of the students to the twelve questions as well as the value of the standard deviation. The maximum value of the mean is five (i.e. Strongly agree=5, Agree=4, Neither agree nor disagree=3, Disagree=2, Strongly disagree=1). Figure 4 shows the results of the Computer Graphics module, Figure 5 presents the results of the Digital Design module at the BUE, and Figure 7 illustrates the results for English modules at the BUE. It is important to note that English modules are compulsory for all students in the different Faculties at the BUE. English is taken alongside the degree area modules and students must pass it. The students, who are studying English module belong to all faculties at BUE. using The Since The the qualitative participants the interactive aim of results this of features the research were research of obtained e-learning was were to determine from as natural an questionnaire important how groups. far The questionnaire (See Table 1) was administered to asset e-learning surveys This means in teaching administered has that the adult helped students students. to to students increase were enrolled at the two motivation and universities studying of in at two In different this paper groups the p-value of students has been in the used. Data p-value Structure is a students Egypt: the two The universities towards British learning University before a the subject, (BUE) research is a twofold a had private begun. task validated They was probability Module at statement Helwan University which answers [2]. the The question: first group If the conducted, university were students [5] i.e. and at using the Helwan British both a qualitative governmental University and [5] university quantitative and Helwan [2]. Null consisted Hypothesis of 17 is students true, then who what participated is the probability in the of research Both University universities methods [2]. Both have of universities relevant data collection. experience introduced The with e-learning research e-learning as is a observing completion test of the statistics paper-based at least survey, as extreme while the as the second one quantitative and learning can offer tool as insights it to measures into support the the factors traditional percentage affecting of face-to-face the students' present observed. group consisted A p-valu of 25 e students of 0.05 for or the less on-line rejects survey. the The null participation and lectures/classes. future state in online of Moodle online versus version education. offline 2.0 assignments. and higher is It used. is also E- hypothesis results of the "at two the surveys 5% level" are shown that in is, Figures the statistical 1 and 2. qualitative learning has as been it depends used as on an the essential results tool of feedback for the learning from a assumptions The Y axis in used Figures imply 1 that and only 2 show 5% the of the value time of would the mean the questionnaire process across given both universities. to students The to online evaluate survey their was supposed for the responses statistical of process the students produce to the a finding twelve questions this extreme as willingness administered to to use students e-learning. in the Faculty of Informatics and if well the as null the hypothesis value of the were standard true. deviation. 5% and 10% The are maximum common Computer Science, the English Department at the BUE and significance value of the levels mean is to five which (i.e. p-values Strongly are agree=5, compared. Agree=4, the Faculty of Computer Science and Information at Neither agree nor disagree=3, Disagree=2, Strongly Helwan University. This study was part of a longitudinal disagree=1). Figure 4 shows the results of the Computer effort to understand the use of technology in teaching Graphics module, Figure 5 presents the results of the within higher education. Digital Design module at the BUE, and Figure 7 illustrates the results for English modules at the BUE. It is important to note that English modules are compulsory for all students in the different Faculties at the BUE. English is taken alongside the degree area modules and students must pass it. The students, who are studying English module belong to all faculties at BUE. using The Since The the qualitative participants the interactive aim of results this of features the research were research of obtained e-learning was were to determine from as natural an questionnaire important how groups. far The questionnaire (See Table 1) was administered to asset e-learning surveys This means in teaching administered has that the adult helped students students. to to students increase were enrolled at the two motivation and universities studying of in at two In different this paper groups the p-value of students has been in the used. Data p-value Structure is a students Egypt: the two The universities towards British learning University before a the subject, (BUE) research is a twofold a had private begun. task validated They was probability Module at statement Helwan University which answers [2]. the The question: first group If the conducted, university were students [5] i.e. and at using the Helwan British both a qualitative governmental University and [5] university quantitative and Helwan [2]. Null ...

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