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-PRACTICAL CHALLENGES AND TECHNIQUES FOR THE COVERT PARTICIPANT OBSERVER

-PRACTICAL CHALLENGES AND TECHNIQUES FOR THE COVERT PARTICIPANT OBSERVER

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In this article, we provide a nuanced perspective on the benefits and costs of covert research. In particular, we illustrate the value of such an approach by focusing on covert participant observation. We posit that all observational studies sit along a continuum of consent, with few research projects being either fully overt or fully covert due to...

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... justification can also be useful in the methods section of the papers themselves so that future covert researchers can build upon those justifications to make a case with their ethical boards. Table 4 summarizes each of the practical considerations of covert participant observation in terms of techniques to address each challenge, associated risks and benefits alongside illustrative examples. It is important to stress that not all of the proposed techniques may be applicable or possible in all covert studies. ...

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... Following the interview protocol (see Appendix A), consent was requested to record the session with an iPhone 7 and a Dream digital recorder as a backup device. An audio recording of interviews is a practical approach to conducting interviews (Roulet, Gill, Stenger, & Gill, 2017). An alphanumeric code for each participant ensures confidentiality. ...
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