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PHIL test result for test 4. Balanced load UI, with PF= 0.9, Pinverter = Pload, VV=off, FW=LA.

PHIL test result for test 4. Balanced load UI, with PF= 0.9, Pinverter = Pload, VV=off, FW=LA.

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Conference Paper
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The high penetration of photovoltaic (PV) distributed energy resources (DER) facilitates the need for today's systems to provide grid support functions and ride-through voltage and frequency events to minimize the adverse impacts on the distribution power system. These new capabilities and its requirements have created concerns that autonomous unin...

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... next test in the test matrix for category B is 4B and while similar to 3B, the EUT's output filter will slightly influence the amount of reactive power need to achieve the target values. For test 4B, approximately 44% reactive power reduces the active power generation by 10% and the results are shown in Figure 7. The next UI test using PHIL is test 5, which has both the voltage and frequency regulating functions on at their most aggressive setting. ...

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Citations

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