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| PDCAAS and DiAAS for selected isolated proteins and foods. 

| PDCAAS and DiAAS for selected isolated proteins and foods. 

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Article
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Protein needs for otherwise healthy individuals older than 19 years are defined by the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) at 0.80 g protein/kg/day. There is no recommendation in the current RDA for subpopulations of older adults or people in various pathological situations. Despite the lack of a separate recommendation, there exists a growing body...

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... protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score uses fecal protein digestibility, and there is significant bacterial (colonic) metabolism of amino acids that can falsely enhance values of true protein digestibility; 2. truncation of PDCAAS values at 1.0 does not account for the bioavailability of individual indispensable amino acids that may have specific roles, and thus, proteins of higher quality are not identified; 3. protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score values are overestimated because of limited bioavailability of specific forms of amino acids such as lysine (25); and 4. fecal protein digestibility values are determined using rats, which have a different requirement for amino acids for growth and maintenance versus humans. Table 1 lists the PDCAAS and DIAAS of some commercially available isolated protein sources and some commonly consumed protein-containing foods. The limiting amino acids in the pro- teins and foods listed in Table 1 differ, but an important point is the reference for PDCAAS is egg protein, whereas in DIAAS, it is a theoretical best protein. ...
Context 2
... 1 lists the PDCAAS and DIAAS of some commercially available isolated protein sources and some commonly consumed protein-containing foods. The limiting amino acids in the pro- teins and foods listed in Table 1 differ, but an important point is the reference for PDCAAS is egg protein, whereas in DIAAS, it is a theoretical best protein. The implementation of DIAAS will, however, take time, and a number of proteins and protein sources will have to be examined for their ileal digestibility. ...
Context 3
... collagen has become a mainstay in a number of supplements, and it has a quality score of 0 unless supplemented with tryptophan. Even with tryptophan supplementation, collagen has a very low quality score ( Table 1). An often cited benefit of collagen supplementation is that since it is derived from bone and cartilage, it contains all of the amino acids necessary to support the health of these tissues. ...
Context 4
... the importance of leucine for stimulating MPS and driven muscle protein retention, the AARR for leucine is shown for seven commonly consumed supplemental proteins ( Table 2). Importantly, in none of the proteins highlighted in table is leucine considered the rate limit- ing amino acid (Table 1) in normal healthy persons; however, it is worth appreciating that in states of muscle loss (aging, critical illness), leucine would become of paramount importance. Thus, considerations of protein quality by DIAAS aside, the leucine content of a protein would also be important to consider, and this appears to be particularly true in aging (39). ...
Context 5
... note is that dietary acid load, which is related to protein intake, may be one of the key factors to consider as opposed to protein load, at least in those with earlier stage (3 or less) (105,108,109). It would seem prudent, on a low-protein intake even in patients with CKD, to emphasize the highest quality proteins possible (Table 1), due to the need for IAA. Trials of high-quality proteins, or ketoacid supplements, and potential combination with alkali-promoting foods or supplements (108, 109) would be a good avenue for future research. ...

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... Increasing protein ingestion can preserve and increase muscle mass and function in older people and protein supplements have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in the elderly [26]. Whey protein is ideal for this anabolic effect as it is rich in the branched chain amino acids, particularly leucine [27]. Due to age-related anabolic resistance, more protein per serve is required to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in older than younger adults [26] and a minimum of 25-30 g protein per meal has been recommended for older people [28]. ...
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